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Social Science, BS

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Rebecca Kasten
rebecca.kasten@fsu.edu
(850) 644-5470

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Social Science web site.

The B.S. in Social Science with a major in Interdisciplinary Social Science (ISS) offers students a liberal arts education that helps them become informed citizens who understand the myriad issues emerging at every level of society. Rather than specializing in a particular content area, an ISS program emphasizes the application of critical thinking skills and cultural and international literacy to several disciplines. Students build on this foundation with concentrations in Public Administration, Sociology, Political Science, Economics, or Geography. Radical changes in nearly all professions require that professionals learn efficiently and adapt quickly to new settings. In this program, students will acquire the skills to adjust quickly to changes in their profession, match problem-solving techniques to a variety of settings, learn new material and methods, and recognize traditions from which new cultures have emerged.

There are no required courses for this major. Students must complete the required hours of major course work from the following participating departments: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, and Urban and Regional Planning. Work must be taken in at least 3 departments. Students must have a primary concentration of 18 hours in Sociology or Public Administration, a secondary concentration of 12 hours in Economics, Sociology, Political Science, Public Administration or Geography, and the remaining 12 hours distributed among any of the remaining departments. Twenty-one hours of the major courses must be completed at FSU at the 3/4000 level. Up to 9 semester hours completed to meet liberal studies or AA requirements may be used toward satisfying ISS major course work.

Accreditation

Regionally accredited through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Method of Delivery

Internet

Time or Location Requirements

Students may be required to take proctored exams at their local community colleges or local libraries.

Time to Completion

The number of hours taken each semester determines how quickly the program is completed. The average is 4-8 semesters of course work

Core Courses

These courses may not be offered every semester.

  • ISS3923 Interdisciplinary Forum
    Interdisciplinary Social Science Colloquium is a forum for ISS majors to explore and share advising, career and academic experiences as members of the field of interdisciplinary studies. Students will obtain an orientation to professional and academic options for ISS students via field trips, visiting lectures, and workshops.
  • ISS4304 Contemporary Social Problems (3)
    This course is designed to introduce the benefits and methods of interdisciplinary research and study. This course uses multiple and interrelated perspectives to identify and explore social issues and problems. Students are guided through the process of building interdisciplinary perspectives to maximize cognitive skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Total Credit Hours

42

Prerequisites

A Florida community college AA degree (or the equivalent) or higher is strongly recommended. Two introductory courses for a total of six credit hours in a social science discipline. All students must be in good academic standing to gain admission or readmission into the program. Oral competency and computer literacy courses are strongly recommended to be completed before admittance.

Program Requirements

There are two required courses for this major: ISS 3923 and ISS 4304. Students must complete the required 42 hours of major course work from at least 3 of the following participating departments: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, and Urban and Regional Planning. Students must have a primary concentration of 18 hours in Geography, Sociology, or Public Administration, a secondary concentration of 12 hours in a different participating department chosen from Economics, Geography, History, Sociology, Political Science, or Public Administration, and the remaining 12 hours distributed among any of the participating departments no used for the primary or secondary concentrations. Twenty-one hours of major course work must be completed at FSU at the 3/4000 level. Up to 9 semester hours completed to meet General Education or AA degree requirements may be used toward satisfying ISS major course work.

In addition to the requirements outlined above, each student must complete all University-wide requirements for graduation (http://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergraduate/information/undergraduate_degree/).

Fees

The cost of this program is equal to tuition and fees for the Academic Year 2017-18 as stated on the Student Business Services website, plus a per credit hour distance learning fee (fees vary by course). Contact the department for more specific fee information relative to student status and location.

Spring 2018 Course Offerings

  • AMH2020 A History of the United States Since 1877 (3)
    This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
  • ECO2000 Introduction to Economics (3)
    This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
  • ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
  • ECO2023 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
  • ECO3431 Analysis of Economic Data (3)
    This course provides basic skills in finding, downloading, displaying, graphing, and analyzing economics data. Topics include locating data sources, graphics methods, such as data smoothing and interpolation, basic statistics, and bivariate and multivariate regression.
  • ECO4713 International Finance (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2023. ECO2023.
    This course focuses on the balance of payments; disequilibrium and adjustments; birth, evolution, and demise of the Bretton Woods System; the managed float; international monetary reform; multinational corporations.
  • ECP3010 Economics of Art and Culture (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO2023.
    This course allows students to use traditional economic analysis of supply and demand to examine the markets for "high art". Students discover in the class that many of the standard approaches to economic analysis apply to these markets, but there are also features of the art markets that are unique.
  • ECS3200 Economics of Asia (3)
    This course is a survey of economic development in the economies of East Asia. The course includes an economic analysis of the factors that contributed to the substantial growth in East Asia from 1960-1989 and the subsequent financial crisis that ensued in the 1990s.
  • GEA1000 World Geography (3)
    This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEO1330 Environmental Science (3)
    This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
  • GEO1400 Human Geography (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. The course discusses how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEO2200C Physical Geography (3)
    This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
  • GEO3423 Sports Geography (3)
    This course focuses on the geographical basis of sports at different spatial scales, including locational strategies of franchises, recruiting patterns, and the urban political economy of professional sports arenas.
  • GEO4412 Environment and Gender (3)
    In this course, students look at how physical space (be it national boundaries or public parks) and the terrain of the symbolic realm are sometimes at odds. Included in this investigation is the examination of how ideas of gender, place and space affect individuals' experiences and how said experiences are created and limited by ideas of space at various geographical scales and contrasts between more and less economically developed nations.
  • GEO4421 Cultural Geography (3)
    This course studies the processes by which various cultural features have diffused throughout the world. Emphasis is on the contemporary cultural landscape.
  • GIS3015 Map Analysis (3)
    This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.
  • ISS3923 Interdisciplinary Forum
    Interdisciplinary Social Science Colloquium is a forum for ISS majors to explore and share advising, career and academic experiences as members of the field of interdisciplinary studies. Students will obtain an orientation to professional and academic options for ISS students via field trips, visiting lectures, and workshops.
  • ISS4304 Contemporary Social Problems (3)
    This course is designed to introduce the benefits and methods of interdisciplinary research and study. This course uses multiple and interrelated perspectives to identify and explore social issues and problems. Students are guided through the process of building interdisciplinary perspectives to maximize cognitive skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • PUP4008 Public Policy Analysis (3)
    Prerequisite: PUP3002.
    This course introduces students to the evaluation and anaylsis of public policy, using the political economy approach.
  • SYA4010 Sociological Theory (3)
    This course introduces the student to the kind of theory which has developed in the field of sociology since its foundation, moving through to the contemporary scene. Major theoretical fields, major theorists, and dominant theoretical issues that continue to be part of the sociological approach to explanation are covered. This is a required course for sociology majors.
  • SYA4300 Methods of Social Research (3)
    This course is a broad coverage of research design, data collection, and data analysis. The course is required for sociology majors.
  • SYA4400 Social Statistics (3)
    This course involves the application of statistical techniques to sociological data as illustrated in the research and writing of social scientists. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student's methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by sociologists. The student is expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of sociological data and to interpret the results. This is a required course for sociology majors.
  • SYD3800 Sociology Sex and Gender (3)
    This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.
  • SYG2010 Social Problems (3)
    This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • SYO3100 Families and Social Change (3)
    This course is a basic sociological approach to conditions, issues, and problems of familial organization within the context of changing institutional structures of modern society. Attention is given to such questions as: How have spouse roles changed, and why? How do changes in the organization of work affect family experience? How are family and kinship patterns affected by an aging population?
  • SYO3460 Sociology of Mass Media (3)
    This course provides a sociological view of mass communications by critically examining the origin, history, and functions of the American mass media and its effect on social life.
  • SYP3000 Social Psychology of Groups (3)
    This course represents the study of social psychology from a sociological perspective. Specifically, it is an analysis of the influence of the groups and the individual on each other, including the study of norms, group pressure, leadership, motivation, and social personality.
  • SYP4550 Alcohol and Drug Problems (3)
    This course presents a review and analysis of sociological approaches to the study of alcohol and drug problems. It addresses theoretical perspectives on recreational and deviant drinking and drug use and introduces important empirical methods in the study of alcohol and drug problems and current debates over alcohol and drug policy.
  • SYP4570 Deviance and Social Control (3)
    This course focuses on major theories and research traditions, including structural and social psychological causes of deviant behavior, processes of labeling deviants, and social conflict over definition and treatment of deviance.
  • SYP4650 Sports and Society (3)
    This course explores the topics of sport from a critical perspective focusing especially on inequalities in gender, race, class, and power. This class jointly examines sports as a social mirror that reflects status inequalities as well as the role of sports in perpetrating social inequalities.
  • URP3000 Introduction to Planning and Urban Development (3)
    This course introduces planning concepts and the role of planning in formulating policy, meeting critical problems, and shaping the future urban environment.
  • World Cities: Quality of Life videoURS1006 World Cities: Quality of Life (3) | View video text only
    In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.

Fall 2017 Course Offerings

  • AMH2020 A History of the United States Since 1877 (3)
    This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
  • CPO3615 Post-Soviet Politics (3)
    Prerequisite: CPO2002 or instructor permission.
    This course examines developments in the so-called 'transition countries' of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, drawing on readings to introduce students to the major debates on economic and political reform in the region.
  • ECO2000 Introduction to Economics (3)
    This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
  • ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
  • ECO2023 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
  • ECO3223 Financial Markets, the Banking System, and Monetary Policy (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO2023.
    This course explores the funcitons of money, bank creation of deposits, and credit; Federal Reserve control of money supply; and monetary theory and policy questions.
  • ECO3431 Analysis of Economic Data (3)
    This course provides basic skills in finding, downloading, displaying, graphing, and analyzing economics data. Topics include locating data sources, graphics methods, such as data smoothing and interpolation, basic statistics, and bivariate and multivariate regression.
  • ECO4713 International Finance (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2023. ECO2023.
    This course focuses on the balance of payments; disequilibrium and adjustments; birth, evolution, and demise of the Bretton Woods System; the managed float; international monetary reform; multinational corporations.
  • ECS3200 Economics of Asia (3)
    This course is a survey of economic development in the economies of East Asia. The course includes an economic analysis of the factors that contributed to the substantial growth in East Asia from 1960-1989 and the subsequent financial crisis that ensued in the 1990s.
  • GEA1000 World Geography (3)
    This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEO1330 Environmental Science (3)
    This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
  • GEO1400 Human Geography (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. The course discusses how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEO2200C Physical Geography (3)
    This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
  • GEO4300 Biogeography (3)
    This course examines the spatial distributions of flora and fauna, ecosystem change, and human interventions such as logging, invasive species, and wilderness preservation.
  • GEO4412 Environment and Gender (3)
    In this course, students look at how physical space (be it national boundaries or public parks) and the terrain of the symbolic realm are sometimes at odds. Included in this investigation is the examination of how ideas of gender, place and space affect individuals' experiences and how said experiences are created and limited by ideas of space at various geographical scales and contrasts between more and less economically developed nations.
  • GIS2040 Essentials of GIS (3)
    This course is an introduction of the basic principles and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS) for students with no or rudimentary knowledge of geographic concepts and practices.
  • GIS3015 Map Analysis (3)
    This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.
  • ISS4304 Contemporary Social Problems (3)
    This course is designed to introduce the benefits and methods of interdisciplinary research and study. This course uses multiple and interrelated perspectives to identify and explore social issues and problems. Students are guided through the process of building interdisciplinary perspectives to maximize cognitive skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • POS4624 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Covil Rights (3)
    Prerequisite: POS1041. Prerequisite may be waived with consent of the instructor.
    This course reviews recent interpretations of the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment case law with special attention to freedom of expression, equal protection, and criminal due process rights.
  • PUP4008 Public Policy Analysis (3)
    Prerequisite: PUP3002.
    This course introduces students to the evaluation and anaylsis of public policy, using the political economy approach.
  • SYA4300 Methods of Social Research (3)
    This course is a broad coverage of research design, data collection, and data analysis. The course is required for sociology majors.
  • SYA4400 Social Statistics (3)
    This course involves the application of statistical techniques to sociological data as illustrated in the research and writing of social scientists. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student's methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by sociologists. The student is expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of sociological data and to interpret the results. This is a required course for sociology majors.
  • SYD3600 Cities in Society (3)
    This course explores changes in societal scale and structure associated with development of cities and urban societies, the impact on individuals and social groups of the urban context, and the ways that life in cities is influenced by social inequalities related to ethnicity, social class, and other dimensions of social organization.
  • SYD3800 Sociology Sex and Gender (3)
    This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.
  • SYG2010 Social Problems (3)
    This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • SYG2430 Sociology of Marriage and the Family (3)
    This course focuses on marriage and family relationships over the life course. Topics covered include dating, love, sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, reconstituted families, parenting, and marital and family relationships in later life. The major course objective is to critically analyze some of our most private social relationships from a sociological perspective.
  • SYO3100 Families and Social Change (3)
    This course is a basic sociological approach to conditions, issues, and problems of familial organization within the context of changing institutional structures of modern society. Attention is given to such questions as: How have spouse roles changed, and why? How do changes in the organization of work affect family experience? How are family and kinship patterns affected by an aging population?
  • SYO3460 Sociology of Mass Media (3)
    This course provides a sociological view of mass communications by critically examining the origin, history, and functions of the American mass media and its effect on social life.
  • SYP3540 Sociology of Law (3)
    This course examines the interrelationship between the legal order and the social order. Limitations of civil and criminal law for conflict management and for implementation of social policy are considered.
  • SYP4550 Alcohol and Drug Problems (3)
    This course presents a review and analysis of sociological approaches to the study of alcohol and drug problems. It addresses theoretical perspectives on recreational and deviant drinking and drug use and introduces important empirical methods in the study of alcohol and drug problems and current debates over alcohol and drug policy.
  • SYP4570 Deviance and Social Control (3)
    This course focuses on major theories and research traditions, including structural and social psychological causes of deviant behavior, processes of labeling deviants, and social conflict over definition and treatment of deviance.
  • SYP4650 Sports and Society (3)
    This course explores the topics of sport from a critical perspective focusing especially on inequalities in gender, race, class, and power. This class jointly examines sports as a social mirror that reflects status inequalities as well as the role of sports in perpetrating social inequalities.
  • URP3000 Introduction to Planning and Urban Development (3)
    This course introduces planning concepts and the role of planning in formulating policy, meeting critical problems, and shaping the future urban environment.
  • World Cities: Quality of Life videoURS1006 World Cities: Quality of Life (3) | View video text only
    In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.


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