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Courses that meet General Education and/or Graduation Requirements

The Liberal Studies Curriculum Requirements lists the requirements for General Education and University-Wide Graduation requirements.

Courses that fulfill General Education or Graduation Requirements and may offer online sections (this varies by semester) are listed by each area below.

Computer Competency


CHM1020C - Chemistry for Liberal Studies


This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. This course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfil the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit is not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.

Diversity in Western Experience (Y)


LEI1181 - Leisure and Recreation Adaptations for All Ages and Abilities


This course will introduce students to the concepts of leisure and recreation for people of varying abilities. Best practices for inclusion in facilities and programs will be reviewed. This course will be interactive with student participation through simulations, group discussions, presentations, and opportunities for personal reflection.


ASL2510 - Deaf Culture


This course acquaints students with the political, cultural, educational, and social parameters of Deaf Culture. Students will develop knowledge regarding the cultural perspective of deafness held in the United States of America and in less depth, worldwide. In comparison, perspectives opposing the cultural view of deafness will also be explored.


CLA3501 - Gender and Society in Ancient Greece


This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law and religion.


GEA4405 - Latin America


This course focuses on contemporary Latin American landscape, its historical formation, societies and problems.


HIS3491 - Medicine & Society


This course examines the development of public health and the history of medicine in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics cover changes in medical knowledge, the medical profession, government responsibilities, and public responses; how individuals accept, modify, or reject medical authority; how race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape health practices and the delivery of medical care; how the health of a community can be protected; and what constitutes a public health hazard.


THE2000 - Introduction to Theatre for Non-Majors


This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.


MUH2019 - Modern Popular Music


This course surveys the development of popular music in America from the early 20th century to the present with a focus on the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. Music as we know, hear, and love it is not created outside of historical and societal influences or pressures. This course will widen your comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation. It will also change the way you hear music throughout your life.


SYG2010 - Social Problems


This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.


PHI2635 - Biomedical Ethics


This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical principles at work in medical decisions.


HUM3321 - Multicultural Dimensions of Film & 20th Century Culture


This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States. The student will benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century..


IFS2072 - America's Popular Music


This course surveys the development of popular music from the 1950s to the present, examining the music and the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. This course will widen your comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation. Throughout, you are asked to investigate the ways in which music and society interact: what can we learn about America's societies and social movements through the examination of ostensibly popular music?


SYO3200 - Sociology of Religion


This course focuses on the basic sociological perspective of the social organization and forms of religious life in modern society. In the course, religious groups are studied as organizations that contribute to social stability, social conflict, and social change.


SYD3800 - Sociology of Sex & Gender


This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.


NSP3185 - Multicultural Factors & Health


This course is a comparative analytical approach to the study of communication, current problems, issues, health care beliefs, values, and practices of different systems and cultural norms as they affect health care practices which conflict with ethnic or cultural communication related to standards and value systems.


EDF2085 - Teaching Diverse Populations


This course examines the complexity of the full range of human groupings and cultural perspectives, as well as the complex relationships among them. Students will gain self-understanding in becoming culturally conscious participants in the global community through examining the differences between individuals and peoples, comparing cultures within the global community, and investigating diversity within Florida populations in general and school community populations in particular.

Cross Cultural Studies (X)


ANT2410 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


This course is an introduction to global diversity through the discipline of cultural anthropology which explores and analyzes the commonalities across societies as well as the unique diversity of human societies and cultures. It offers tools for understanding the distinctive ways in which people make sense of their world while framing our own world in a new perspective. This course introduces key concepts including kinship, gender, culture, religion, race, consumption, nationalism, and globalization and provides an opportunity to learn more about these concepts in a variety of social and cultural contexts around the world.


ASH1044 - Middle Eastern History and Civilization


This introductory course is on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course is to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.


URS1006 - World Cities: Quality of Life


In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.


ADV3410 - Hispanic Marketing Communication


This course prepares undergraduate students to become educated decision makers and consumers of information regarding U.S. Hispanic marketing communication issues.


HFT2890 - International Food and Culture


The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.


SPM4013 - Cross-Cultural Sport


This course approaches sport through a variety of global perspectives and cultural lenses. Students are exposed to different national contexts, histories, leagues, and governing bodies, as well as the social, cultural, political, and economic imperatives organizing sport and its management, including global mega-events (e.g., Olympics, World Cup) and national structures (e.g., Barclay's Premier League).


REL1300 - Introduction to World Religions


This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.


REL2315 - Religions of South Asia


This course studies the history and culture of the religious traditions of South Asia. A study of the manifestations of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, and Christianity in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.


GEA1000 - World Geography


This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.


HFT2061 - Ales, Lagers, & International Culture


This course is an introduction to ales and lagers of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these regional beers and the interrelation with their culture, including food, heritage, and festivals.


HFT2062 - International Wine & Culture


This course is an introduction to wines of the world with a focus upon the importance to global cultures. Students learn about these regional wines and the interrelationship with their cultures and heritage.


PHM2300 - Introduction to Political Philosophy


This course is an introduction to some of the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.


GEO1400 - Human Geography


This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. In particular, how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.


EUH3205 - 19th Century Europe: A Survey


This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.


HFT2060 - Coffee & Tea


This course is delivered online and is an introduction to coffees and teas of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these beverages and their unique interrelationship with their regional culture, heritage, and environment. Each beverage focuses upon specific regions of the world.


IDS2170 - Music in the World


This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts. The focus, therefore, is on how music works in the world. This leads us to also ask how the world works within music.


MUH2051 - Music Cultures of World: Music of Tribal & Folk Cultures


This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. While we will be looking at musical traditions from several geographic regions, the focus of the course is not exclusive to traditional music per se. Rather, we will analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts.


HFT2063 - Distilled Spirits and International Culture


This is a course delivered online and is an introduction to distilled spirits of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students will learn about these regionally distilled beverages and their interrelationship with their culture, heritage, and environment. This class presents distilled spirits from various regions and countries of the world representing the USA, Canada, South and Central America, Asia, Europe, Africa and the Middle East, among others.


CLT3378 - Ancient Mythology, East & West


This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.

English Composition


ENC2135 - Research, Genre, and Context


ENC 2135 is the second of two required composition courses at Florida State University. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC 1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, ENC 2135 focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.

Humanities and Cultural Practice


IDS2194 - The Immigrant Experience in Contemporary America


This course explores essential questions of the “immigrant experience” in contemporary American literature. Students will engage a variety of texts, including novels, films, memoirs, essays and historical/ documentary materials.


IDS2166 - Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society


Visual Arts may sometimes be seen as merely things to hang on a wall or placed in a room to be passively viewed. However significant works of art, particularly at the time of their creation, have the power to shape ideology, cultural trends and even politics. Selected works will be examined not only for their aesthetic value but also for their impact on society, as well as their use as propaganda.


IDS2173 - A Social History of America's Popular Music


This course offers an introduction to the history of American popular music and examines how cultural, social, economic, and political issues are intertwined with various musical styles that have been integral to popular culture in the United States. By studying specific artists and works representative of these various styles, and placing them within their proper historical and cultural context, you will gain a deeper understanding of the music and its significance to American society. Through readings, listening exercises, concert attendance, and written assignments, you will develop critical listening skills and learn how to discuss and write about music using appropriate terminology.


IDS3169 - Art and the Environment


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel environmental art and design. We will explore a wide range of creative media, methods, and themes used by visual artists & designers that address the environment. By analyzing, discussing and writing about environmental art and design, you can develop an enhanced awareness of the complexities we are faced with globally and gather perspectives on the ways artists attempt to affect change.


IDS3167 - Contemporary Art as a Mirror


Much like a mirror, contemporary art has the ability to reflect a unique perspective within a particular point in time, and it is important to look at art through this lens because it can embody a variety of perspectives on identity, values, and beliefs. This course identifies the cultural landscape that artists are currently exploring and discusses a variety of artists’ works to explore and critically analyze the ways that art can function as a mirror of contemporary society.


ART2003C - Contemporary Art Scholarship/Practice


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. We will explore a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists & designers to build meaning into their images, objects, and experiences. Offered to all non-art majors.


IDS2293 - Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts and Music


What are rape myths? How are myths about rape portrayed in Western culture? Even a cursory view of literature, art and music beginning with the Greeks to the present day reveals that rape and violence, particularly toward women, are common cultural themes depicted in the many myths, legends, paintings, sculptures and music that have endured. This course identifies cultural representations of rape and violence in literature, music and the arts and discusses current research in rape myth recognition to explain how these areas are interrelated.


CLA3501 - Gender and Society in Ancient Greece


This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law and religion.


HUM2020 - The Art of Being Human: Examining the Human Condition Through Literature, Art and Film


In this course, students will gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature.This course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected.


CLT2049 - Medical Terminology


This course introduces students to the medical and technical vocabulary based on Latin and Greek elements in medical Latin and English.


REL1300 - Introduction to World Religions


This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.


REL2315 - Religions of South Asia


This course studies the history and culture of the religious traditions of South Asia. A study of the manifestations of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, and Christianity in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.


THE2000 - Introduction to Theatre for Non-Majors


This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.


HUM2210 - Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from prehistoric times to about 400 A.D.


HUM2235 - Humanities: From Renaissance to Enlightenment


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.


HUM2250 - Humanities: 18th Century Romanticism to Postmodernism


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the eighteenth Century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.


MUH2019 - Modern Popular Music


This course surveys the development of popular music in America from the early 20th century to the present with a focus on the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. Music as we know, hear, and love it is not created outside of historical and societal influences or pressures. This course will widen your comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation. It will also change the way you hear music throughout your life.


ARH2000 - Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision


This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.


HUM3321 - Multicultural Dimensions of Film & 20th Century Culture


This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States. The student will benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.


IDS2170 - Music in the World


This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts. The focus, therefore, is on how music works in the world. This leads us to also ask how the world works within music.


MUH2051 - Music Cultures of World: Music of Tribal & Folk Cultures


This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. While we will be looking at musical traditions from several geographic regions, the focus of the course is not exclusive to traditional music per se. Rather, we will analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts.


MUL2010 - Music Literature, Listening and Understanding


An introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. Development of knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.


LIT3438 - Literature and Medicine


Courses in Literature and Medicine study how literary texts address questions in medical ethics and public health. In Literature and Medicine: Diseases and Debates, students will read a selection of essays, fiction, poetry, and other texts from the Victorian period to examine a series of spirited debates from that time. These controversies helped shape the landscape of medical professional ethics as we now understand it. Each topic we examine will be paired with a set of readings that address similar concerns in the contemporary setting. This course builds skills in critical reading and writing, cultural practice, and ethics.


CLT3378 - Ancient Mythology, East & West


This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.

Formative Experience


COM4945 - Communication Internship


Supervised internship. Credit proportional to scope and significance of work. Credit may not be applied to graduate degrees. Individually designed to accommodate student's background and objectives.


ACG4941 - Accounting Internship


This accounting internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. S/U grade only.


CCJ4940 - Internship in Criminology


This internship facilitates field placement in an approved criminal justice agency for integration of theory and practice through participant observation study.


CCJ4942 - Part Time Internship in Criminology


This course facilitates part time field placement in an approved criminal justice agency for integration of theory and practice through participant oberservation study.


CJE4710 - Public Safety and Security Capstone


This course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills, and capabilities learned in the program through a capstone project thought working with a Public Safety & Security Agency or Guided Research.


ENT4943 - Entrepreneurship Internship


This course is designed to provide an experiential learning lab on how to perform business research and to apply that research to the Internship Sponsor. You will learn basic competitive intelligence techniques and utilize critical thinking skills to synthesize data and intelligence into a presentation that will provide a useful and practical result to the Internship Sponsor. These techniques can be applied to a wide range of industries.


FAD4805 - Practicum in Family and Child Science


This course is designed to provide students with experiences in a community setting serving children, youth, and families and the opportunity to apply course material to the work environment.


FIN4941 - Finance Internship


This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the finance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty adviser, and the internship director.


GEB4941 - Business Internship


This business internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.


ISM4941 - Field Study in Management Information Systems


This course provides students with learning opportunities in the organizational management information systems environments beyond those available in existing MIS courses.


LDR3263 - Leadership Experience


This experiential-based course offers participants an opportunity to put into practice the knowledge, theory, and skills they have learned in previous courses in the Certification program. Students select and create an experience, complete an experiential learning contract for the course, and do extensive reflection on their experience throughout the course.


MAN4941 - Field Study in Management


This course provides students with on-the-job experience in major area.


MAR4941 - Marketing Internship


This course is a marketing internship designed for marketing majors who want to gain real world experience in the marketing field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty adviser and the internship director.


REE4941 - Real Estate Internship


This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the real estate field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. S/U grade only.


RMI4941 - Risk Management and Insurance Internship


This internship is designed for Risk Management Insurance majors to gain real world experience in the Risk Management Insurance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional and the internship director. Prerequisites: RMI-3011 and six additional hours of business/risk management and insurance coursework.


TSL4324 - ESOL Instruction in the Content Areas


This course focuses on the theory and application of second-language learning and teaching strategies for limited English-proficient students in subject matter classes. The course also satisfies META requirements for all teachers of LEP students except primary language arts instructors. This course is appropriate for renewal of all certification coverage.

E-Series


IDS2194 - The Immigrant Experience in Contemporary America


This course explores essential questions of the “immigrant experience” in contemporary American literature. Students will engage a variety of texts, including novels, films, memoirs, essays and historical/documentary materials.


IDS2166 - Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society


Visual Arts may sometimes be seen as merely things to hang on a wall or placed in a room to be passively viewed. However significant works of art, particularly at the time of their creation, have the power to shape ideology, cultural trends and even politics. Selected works will be examined not only for their aesthetic value but also for their impact on society, as well as their use as propaganda.


IDS2173 - A Social History of America's Popular Music


This course offers an introduction to the history of American popular music and examines how cultural, social, economic, and political issues are intertwined with various musical styles that have been integral to popular culture in the United States. By studying specific artists and works representative of these various styles, and placing them within their proper historical and cultural context, you will gain a deeper understanding of the music and its significance to American society. Through readings, listening exercises, concert attendance, and written assignments, you will develop critical listening skills and learn how to discuss and write about music using appropriate terminology.


IDS3169 - Art and the Environment


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel environmental art and design. We will explore a wide range of creative media, methods, and themes used by visual artists & designers that address the environment. By analyzing, discussing and writing about environmental art and design, you can develop an enhanced awareness of the complexities we are faced with globally and gather perspectives on the ways artists attempt to affect change.


IDS3167 - Contemporary Art as a Mirror


Much like a mirror, contemporary art has the ability to reflect a unique perspective within a particular point in time, and it is important to look at art through this lens because it can embody a variety of perspectives on identity, values, and beliefs. This course identifies the cultural landscape that artists are currently exploring and discusses a variety of artists’ works to explore and critically analyze the ways that art can function as a mirror of contemporary society.


IDS2170 - Music in the World


This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. As we survey music from around the world, we will emphasize the social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts. The focus, therefore, is on how music works in the world. This leads us to also ask how the world works within music.


IDS2293 - Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts and Music


What are rape myths? How are myths about rape portrayed in Western culture? Even a cursory view of literature, art and music beginning with the Greeks to the present day reveals that rape and violence, particularly toward women, are common cultural themes depicted in the many myths, legends, paintings, sculptures and music that have endured. This course identifies cultural representations of rape and violence in literature, music and the arts and discusses current research in rape myth recognition to explain how these areas are interrelated.


IDS2134 - Evolution Medicine Evidence


This online course introduces the study of evolution as it applies to the practice of medicine. We will investigate what constitutes scientific evidence, how to use evidence, the evidence concerning biological evolution, and the implications of evolution for the practice of medicine.

Ethics


IDS2293 - Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts and Music


What are rape myths? How are myths about rape portrayed in Western culture? Even a cursory view of literature, art and music beginning with the Greeks to the present day reveals that rape and violence, particularly toward women, are common cultural themes depicted in the many myths, legends, paintings, sculptures and music that have endured. This course identifies cultural representations of rape and violence in literature, music and the arts and discusses current research in rape myth recognition to explain how these areas are interrelated.


PHI2635 - Biomedical Ethics


This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical principles at work in medical decisions.


PHM2300 - Introduction to Political Philosophy


This course is an introduction to some of the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.


PAD3003 - Public Administration in American Society


This introductory course in public administration studies the management of large-scale government bureaucracies including organization, career systems, and financing. It also focuses on the role of bureaucracies in modern society in the formulation and implementation of public policy.


LIT3438 - Literature and Medicine


Courses in Literature and Medicine study how literary texts address questions in medical ethics and public health. In Literature and Medicine: Diseases and Debates, students will read a selection of essays, fiction, poetry, and other texts from the Victorian period to examine a series of spirited debates from that time. These controversies helped shape the landscape of medical professional ethics as we now understand it. Each topic we examine will be paired with a set of readings that address similar concerns in the contemporary setting. This course builds skills in critical reading and writing, cultural practice, and ethics.

History


ASH1044 - Middle Eastern History and Civilization


This introductory course is on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course is to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.


CLT2049 - Medical Terminology


This course introduces students to the medical and technical vocabulary based on Latin and Greek elements in medical Latin and English.


HIS3491 - Medicine & Society


This course examines the development of public health and the history of medicine in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics cover changes in medical knowledge, the medical profession, government responsibilities, and public responses; how individuals accept, modify, or reject medical authority; how race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape health practices and the delivery of medical care; how the health of a community can be protected; and what constitutes a public health hazard.


EUH3205 - 19th Century Europe: A Survey


This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.


AMH2020 - A History of the U. S. SINCE 1877 (Civil War to present)


This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.

Natural Sciences


CJE3762 - Forensic Science in Investigation


This course combines various theories of crime with knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime to yield scientific data that enables forensic science to aid in the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity.


CJE3762L - Forensic Science in Investigation Laboratory


This laboratory applies various techniques for the examination of physical materials generated during the commission of a crime in order to produce information required to detect and investigate criminal activity. This virtual laboratory emphasizes the implementation of scientific protocols for collection and analysis of evidence and the calculation of associated error rates.


HUN1201 - The Science of Nutrition


This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.


CHM1020C - Chemistry for Liberal Studies


This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. This course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit is not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.


OCE1001 - Elementary Oceanography


This course studies the structure and motion of the ocean and its environs, properties, populations, and energy budget. Not intended for upper-division science or mathematics majors. Upper-division science or mathematics majors are encouraged instead to take OCE 4008.


MET1010 - Introduction to Atmosphere


This course covers the structure of the atmosphere; weather processes and weather systems, including climatic processes. Credit may not be received in this course if student has already received credit in 2000-level or higher MET courses.


EVR1001 - Introduction to Environmental Science


This class is an Introduction to Environmental Science and will cover the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.


EVR1001L - Environmental Science Laboratory


Environmental Science Laboratory that meets Liberal Studies Natural Science Laboratory requirement. Laboratory is conducted in "Second Life" virtual reality in an asynchronous manner.


IDS2134 - Evolution, Medicine and Evidence


This online course introduces the study of evolution as it applies to the practice of medicine. We will investigate what constitutes scientific evidence, how to use evidence, the evidence concerning biological evolution, and the implications of evolution for the practice of medicine.

Quantitative and Logical Thinking


ISC1057 - Computational Thinking


This course introduces students to the process of creating a representation of a task so that it can be performed by a computer.The course investigates strategies behind popular computational methods which are shaping our daily lives and our future. Students practice logical thinking by applying versions of these computational methods to problems in science and society.


STA1013 - Statistics Through Example


This course provides students with a background in applied statistical reasoning. Fundamental topics are covered including graphical and numerical description of data, understanding randomness, central tendency, correlation versus causation, line of best fit, estimation of proportions, and statistical testing.


MAC2311 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry


This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.


MAC2312 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry II


This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.


STA2122 - Introduction to Applied Statistics


Prerequisite: MAC 1105. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200. The course covers Normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics.


STA2023 - Fundamental Business Statistics


Prerequisite: None, but we recommend two years of high school algebra. High school students who earn a "3" or better on the AP Statistics exam will be given credit for STA 2023. The course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, Binomial and Normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.

Scholarship in Practice


IDS2166 - Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society


Visual Arts may sometimes be seen as merely things to hang on a wall or placed in a room to be passively viewed. However significant works of art, particularly at the time of their creation, have the power to shape ideology, cultural trends and even politics. Selected works will be examined not only for their aesthetic value but also for their impact on society, as well as their use as propaganda.


IDS3169 - Art and the Environment


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel environmental art and design. We will explore a wide range of creative media, methods, and themes used by visual artists & designers that address the environment. By analyzing, discussing and writing about environmental art and design, you can develop an enhanced awareness of the complexities we are faced with globally and gather perspectives on the ways artists attempt to affect change.


LDR2560 - Leadership in Film


The course initiates a thoughtful consideration of the nature of leadership as depicted in film. Film provides unique insights to investigate character and motive, as well as culture, allowing us to access meaning and significance through theoretical, analytic and dialogic inquiry. Reflection, introspection, and personal engagement aimed toward a richly layered encounter with the lives of leaders contributes to the formation of a more enduring and authentic leadership response to personal, organizational, and global complexities.


ART2003C - Contemporary Art Scholarship/Practice


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. We will explore a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists & designers to build meaning into their images, objects, and experiences. Offered to all non-art majors.


CLT3378 - Ancient Mythology, East & West


This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.


ENT4943 - Entrepreneurship Internship (3)


Prerequisite: ENT2010, ENT2011, and ENT3003. This course is restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information. This course is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the Entrepreneurship field through on-the-job-practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional and the Director of Internships and Career Services.


HIS4164 - Digital History


This course examines the theory and practice of the ways in which history is collected, preserved, and interpreted using digital mediums.


HUM2210 - Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from prehistoric times to about 400 A.D.


HUM2235 - Humanities: From Renaissance to Enlightenment


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.


HUM2250 - Humanities: 18th Century Romanticism to Postmodernism


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the eighteenth Century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.


HUM3321 - Multicultural Dimensions of Film & 20th Century Culture


This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States. The student will benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.


IFS2098 - Global Engagement


Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on - such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.


LDR2101 - Leadership in Theory and Practice


This course is designed to inspire, teach, and engage students in the process of learning leadership. The course introduces students to leadership theory and helps them understand their unique role in leadership on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.


RMI4941 - Risk Management and Insurance Internship.


This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the risk management/insurance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.


STA3064 - Modeling with SAS


This course will cover the following topics utilizing the SAS software: ANOVA, linear modeling, logistic regression, bootstrap sampling, simulation using the data step, and some additional analytic topics.


SOW4522 - Integrative Field Seminar


This course assists students in the integration of their social work courses with social work practice. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the students ability to apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice to systems of all sizes. This course has been approved for the Liberal Studies requirements for Scholarship-in-Practice and thus is designed to help you become an applied and lifelong learner. Majors only.

Social Sciences


ANT2410 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


This course is an introduction to global diversity through the discipline of cultural anthropology which explores and analyzes the commonalities across societies as well as the unique diversity of human societies and cultures. It offers tools for understanding the distinctive ways in which people make sense of their world while framing our own world in a new perspective. This course introduces key concepts including kinship, gender, culture, religion, race, consumption, nationalism, and globalization and provides an opportunity to learn more about these concepts in a variety of social and cultural contexts around the world.


LIS3103 - Information & Society


This course examines major issues related to living in the "information society," including information literacy, information security, identity theft, privacy, intellectual property, and information ethics. Students gain skills in searching the Web, electronic databases, and print resources. The three broad areas covered by the course are personal information management, academic information, and career/professional information.


ECO2000 - Introduction to Economics


This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.


FAD2230 - Family Relationships: Life Span Dev. Approach


Examines the dynamics of contemporary family life and interpersonal relationships in a changing society and over the life course.


GEA4405 - Latin America


This course focuses on contemporary Latin American landscape, its historical formation, societies and problems.


CCJ2020 - Intro to Criminal Justice


This course is designed to provide freshman and sophomore students with knowledge of terminology, classification systems, trends, and theories of criminal justice.


ECO2013 - Principles of Macroeconomic


This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.


ECO2023 - Principles of Microeconomics


This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.


SYG2010 - Social Problems


This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.


URS1006 - World Cities: Quality of Life


In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.


GEA1000 - World Geography


This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems. .


GEO1330 - Environmental Science


This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.


GEO1400 - Human Geography


This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. In particular, this course explores how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development. .


SYO3100 - Family Problems & Social Change


This course is a basic sociological approach to conditions, issues, and problems of familial organization within the context of changing institutional structures of modern society. Attention is given to such questions as: how have spouse roles changed, and why? How do changes in the organization of work affect family experience? How are family and kinship patterns affected by an aging population?


CCJ3011 - Criminology


This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.


CCJ4662 - Minorities, Crime, & Social Policy


This course examines the involvement of minorities, especially African-Americans, in crime and in the criminal justice system. Special attention is paid to the role of racism in theories of crime and in American law and to the treatment of minorities by the various components of the criminal justice system. May require community service hours.


SYO3200 - Sociology of Religion


This course focuses on the basic sociological perspective of the social organization and forms of religious life in modern society. In the course, religious groups are studied as organizations that contribute to social stability, social conflict, and social change.


SYD3800 - Sociology of Sex & Gender


This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.

Oral Communication Competency


SPC2608 - Public Speaking


This course covers both the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).


COM2080 - Online Communication and Presence


Provides students with theoretical background and practical experience in constructing messages for online communication, as well as managing self-presentation and professional relationships in the online environment. Includes critical analysis of information sources and audiences and the development and delivery of online oral presentations.

Upper-Division Writing Competency


RED4310 - Early Literacy Learning


This course prepares pre-service teachers to teach beginning reading, targeting the needs of a wide range of learners, including those of varying abilities and from diverse cultures. The content addresses research-based strategies, materials, technology, assessment, classroom management and collaboration with other professionals and parents.


SPM4014 - Sport and Literature


The course will use literary theory to critically analyze and interpret a series of popular sport-related novels. The course focuses on the role that literature in general, and sport-based books in particular, have played in promoting and challenging structures of gender, nationalism, sexuality, race, social class, and ability in the United States and Western society more generally.


MMC4300 - Diffusion of Innovations


This course is an analysis of the process of change, particularly from the standpoint of how communication is used in the introduction, spread, and adoption of new ideas, behaviors, and products within a society.


INS3003 - Introduction to International Affairs


This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. This course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.

State Mandated Writing


ART2003C - Contemporary Art Scholarship/Practice


This class provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. We will explore a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists & designers to build meaning into their images, objects, and experiences. Offered to all non-art majors.


ASH1044 - Middle Eastern History and Civilization


This introductory course is on Middle Eastern history and culture with a considerable emphasis on the impact of religion: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The primary emphasis of the course is to understand the historical and cultural background of the major problems facing the Middle East today. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.


CLA3501 - Gender and Society in Ancient Greece


This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law and religion.


CLT3378 - Ancient Mythology, East & West


This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.


EUH3205 - 19th Century Europe: A Survey


This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.


HIS3491 - Medicine & Society


This course examines the development of public health and the history of medicine in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Topics cover changes in medical knowledge, the medical profession, government responsibilities, and public responses; how individuals accept, modify, or reject medical authority; how race, class, gender, and ethnicity shape health practices and the delivery of medical care; how the health of a community can be protected; and what constitutes a public health hazard.


HUM2210 - Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from prehistoric times to about 400 A.D.


HUM2235 - Humanities: From Renaissance to Enlightenment


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.


HUM2250 - Humanities: 18th Century Romanticism to Postmodernism


This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the eighteenth Century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.


HUM3321 - Multicultural Dimensions of Film & 20th Century Culture


This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. By watching movies with a better understanding of their biases and prejudices we may confront them and contest them in order to celebrate the cultural diversity of the United States. The student will benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.


PHI2635 - Biomedical Ethics


This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical principles at work in medical decisions.


REL1300 - Introduction to World Religions


This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.