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Fall 2018 Courses

  • ACG2021 - Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
    This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
  • ACG2071 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG2021 with a grade of "C-" or better..
    This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
  • ACG3171 - Analysis of Financial Statement Presentation (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG2021 with a grade of "C-" or better.
    This course offers an analysis of the assumptions and procedures underlying financial statements and the impact of accounting policies on the use of the financial disclosures made by business enterprises. Credit not allowed for accounting majors.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • ACG3331 - Cost Accounting and Analysis for Business Decisions (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG2071 with a grade of "C-" or better.
    This course studies techniques of cost accounting and cost analysis for various business decisions. Credit is not allowed for accounting majors.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • ACG4941 - Accounting Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.
    This accounting internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • ADE5083 - Human Resource Development (3)
    This course offers a comprehensive survey of the structure and function of human-resource development in organizations. Focus is on alternative perspectives, professional roles and competencies, as well as on the organizational features affecting Human-Resource Development operations and programs.
  • ADV3410 - Hispanic Marketing Communication (3)
    This course prepares undergraduate students to become educated decision makers and consumers of information regarding US Hispanic marketing communication issues.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • ADV4411 - Multicultural Marketing Communication (3)
    This course is geared to train students to become effective communicators and marketers when reaching out to multicultural society. Marketers, communicators, and service providers interested in being effective in reaching out to culturally diverse groups need to become adept at designing messages and strategies geared to a culturally diverse society.
  • AFA3101 - Theory of African American Studies (3)
    This course engages theories of race discrimination and oppression as it relates to African Americans. Students systematically and objectively examine the sources of American oppression and explore how it shapes the life chances of African Americans from prior to the Reconstruction Era to the twenty-first century. The course explores the timing and manner of their entry into U.S. society, conflicts with other groups, encounters with prejudice and discrimination, as well as the extent to which they have secured access to cultural, economic, political, and social assimilation into U.S. society.
  • AMH2020 - A History of the United States Since 1877 (3)
    This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
  • APK2001 - Medical and Scientific Terminology (3)
    This course is the study of medical and scientific terminology, the language of medicine that focuses on prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms by review of each body system and specialty area. Emphasis is on word construction, usage, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling. In addition, students gain information regarding anatomy and physiology, pathology, diagnostic/surgical procedures, pharmacology, scientific equipment and instruments, and abbreviations.
  • ARE5245 - Program Development for Educational and Community Contexts (3)
    In this course, students learn through the exploration and development of curricular and/or program development in the arts in formal and informal educational settings.
  • ARE5246 - Contemporary and Historical Issues in Art Education (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Admission to the Art Education Teacher Certification Program. .
    This course is an exploration of current and historical issues in art education. In that context, the goal of this course is to present a conceptual overview of significant concepts and issues in art education through examining primarily current and historical writings and writers in the field. In addition, methods of historical and contextual research as well as issues related to writing history are also examined. All course assignments and experiences are formulated to encourage reflection and explorations between personal interests and experiences, artistic practices, scholarly inquiry, and interdisciplinary thinking.
  • ARH2000 - Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision (3)
    This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
  • ART3654C - Web 1: Art, Design, Code (3)
    Prerequisite: ART1201, ART1300, and ART1602.
    In this course, students learn to conceptualize, design, and program responsive websites as both an applied and creative practice. Through a combination of technical topics in interface design and development such as usability, coding in HTML, CSS, Javascript and Jquery, as well as readings and discussions around net-based artworks and historical and cultural concerns surrounding the internet as a communication platform, students execute interactive projects that are both culturally-relevant and technically sophisticated.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • BUL3310 - The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business (3)
    An introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, agency/unemployment law, and related topics.
  • CCJ2020 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
    This course is designed to provide freshman and sophomore students with knowledge of terminology, classification systems, trends, and theories of criminal justice.
  • CCJ3011 - Criminology (3)
    This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • The Criminal Justice System videoCCJ3024 The Criminal Justice System | View video text only (3)
    This course provides an advanced overview of principles and practical applications of criminal law, criminal procedure, and criminological theory. Special emphasis is placed on how the components of the criminal justice system: the prosecutorial and defense function, the judiciary, and the field of corrections are synthesized into a functioning process of public safety and security.
  • Crime in Media videoCCJ3032 Crime in Media | View video text only (3)
    This course provides students with an understanding of the impact of the media on crime, criminals, the criminal justice system, and the general public. The focus of this course is the historical impact of media and its influences on the outcomes of both routine and sensational cases within the American criminal justice system and how media reporting affects the policy making processes and the social definitions of crime.
  • CCJ3071 - Computer Applications in Criminal Justice (3)
    This course is designed to prepare the student for the use of IT in various professions within the Criminal Justice community. This includes, the fundamentals of computing, the use of data processing, word processing, email, Computer Automated Dispatch, Records Management Systems, use of the Internet and IT Security protocols.
  • CCJ3484 - Ethics in Policing and Intelligence (3)
    This course explores ethics for both the criminal justice system and intelligence professionals. It compares and contrasts the differing roles ethics plays in policing and intelligence communities. The course probes significant past and current events to illuminate issues relevant to ethics in intelligence and policing.
  • CCJ4614 - Criminal Delinquent Behaviour (3)
    This course is an examination of patterns of criminal and delinquent behaviors in the light of theories and classification concepts.
  • Evidential Reasoning for Research and Investigation videoCCJ4744 Evidential Reasoning for Research and Investigation | View video text only (3)
    This course introduces the formal and informal approaches for making decisions on information that is uncertain and from diverse sources. Techniques are examined for collecting and using both qualitative and quantitative data to draw inferences about public safety and security programs and investigations.
  • CCJ4938 - Special Topics Course (3)
    This course content varies as instructors present different developments, problems, and controversies. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours. May be repeated within the same term.
  • CCJ5078 - Computer Applications in Criminal Justice (3)
    This course introduces the computer and the Internet. The course includes a discussion of the use of these technologies within the criminal justice system. It covers word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, and Internet applications such as e-mail, chat, forum discussions, search engines, Web page browsers, etc.
  • CCJ5705 - Research Methods in Criminology I (3)
    This course is a research design for criminological studies with an emphasis on data collection methods, measurement of validity and reliability, and causal analysis.
  • CCJ6665 - Victimology (3)
    Prerequisite: CCJ5705. CCJ5706.
    This course introduces students to the field of victimology and explores its conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature within various subareas.
  • CCJ6920 - Special Topics - Criminal Justice Policy (3)
    For this course, contents vary as instructors present different developments, problems, and controversies. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • CDA3101 - Computer Organization II (3)
    Prerequisite: CDA3100.
    This course explores the fundamental concepts in processor design, including datapath and control, pipelining, memory hierarchies, and I/O.
  • CEN4020 - Software Engineering I (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: COP4530.
    This course starts with a rigorous study of object oriented design techniques and an introduction to current practices in Software Engineer. By the end of the course, students participate in a group design project putting into practice what they have learned to date. Topics include UML, Object Oriented Design, theory and practice of software engineering, ethics in Computer Science and Software Engineering, Software Engineering tools, requirements elicitation, software-requirements specification, requirements review, software development, software-development life cycle, teams, and project management.
  • CEN4681 - Expert Systems (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: COP4530.
    This course covers definitions and historical development, methodology tools for analysis and design, survey of existing systems, inference engines, and theory and applications of fuzzy relational products to new developments in inference engines.
  • CGS2060 - Computer Fluency (3)
    This course teaches important computer and digital technology concepts and skills necessary to succeed in careers and in life. Course topics range from computer literacy basics, to today's technologies, and to the information systems on which today's businesses and organizations depend. Students learn about telecommunications, the Internet and the Web, management information systems, digital media, information security, digital society, as well as ethics.
  • CGS2518 - Spreadsheets for Business Environments (3)
    This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.
  • CGS2821 - Introduction to Web Site Design (3)
    This course teaches proper Web site design techniques to students from all degree programs. Topics include visual design and graphics, information architecture, usability and accessibility, communication, adaptation to audience, markup languages, and development tools and processes. Coursework is focused on applying proper Web site design principles and techniques to projects in the students' disciplines. The course is gauged for beginners who are computer competent; it does not teach computer programming.
  • CHD2220 - Child Growth and Development: The Foundation Years (3)
    This course is the study of children from birth through middle childhood.
  • CHD3243 - Contexts in Adolescent Development (3)
    Prerequisite: CHD2220.
    This course examines the developmental process related to cognitive, physical, and psychosocial growth from pre to late adolescence and the reciprocal influences of various contexts in which these youth are embedded, such as families, peer groups, schools, and communities.
  • CHD4537 - Parenting (3)
    Prerequisite: Major Status.
    This course is a comprehensive review of the contemporary theory and research in parenting. The course is organized developmentally, focusing on the emerging needs, responsibilities, and skills required by parents at progressive stages of their children's development.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • CHD4615 - Public Policy: Child and Family Issues (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Major status or instructor permission..
    This course uses readings, lecture, discussion, guest speakers, field work, research, and writing, for students to become familiar with the process of formulating, implementing, and evaluating public policy. Family and child issues that have resulted in policy decisions at every level are identified, and current issues that are in need of attention by policy makers are explored. Research related to family issues and its impact on family policy is analyzed with emphasis on enhancing the role of family and child professionals in policy process.
  • CHD4630 - Methods of Studying Families and Children (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Admission to the major..
    This course examines research methods, concepts, principles, and issues in studying families and children.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • CIS3250 - Ethics and Computer Science (3)
    This course presents basic ethical theories and analysis methods as they apply to ethical, social, and legal issues in computing and information technology. Case studies and hypothetical scenarios are discussed for their social, ethical, and legal implications, as well as analyzed through various ethical-analysis methodologies. The course fosters the development of skills in logical and critical analysis of issues and viewpoints.
  • Interview and Interrogation videoCJE3612 Interview and Interrogation | View video text only (3)
    Prerequisite: CJE4611.
    This course provides both a theoretical and practical introduction to collecting reliable information via interviewing and interrogation for use in criminal justice and corporate investigations. Students examine and evaluate the key concepts of differential techniques of interviewing and interrogation, explanations of behavioral symptom analysis, principles of kinesics, aspects of verbalizations, explanation of legal constraints on confessions, the production of evidence indicating deception and malingering, and management aspects of the interview.
  • CJE3648 - Crime Scene Professionalism (3)
    This course emphasizes the qualities that mark a true professional in the field of crime scene investigation. The course covers crime scene safety, chain of custody, ethics, impartiality, the manipulation, and mishandling or misinterpreting of evidence. There is a focus on preventing contamination, report writing, and courtroom reputation and presentation.
  • CJE3732 - Criminal Intelligence (3)
    This course focuses on the production of intelligence from the analysis of multiple and diverse sources of information and on its use by formal and informal intelligence agencies. Emphasis is placed on the role of local public safety and security personnel and organizations as both producers and consumers of intelligence and on their relationship to the formal intelligence agencies.
  • Introduction to Underwater Investigation videoCJE3761 Introduction to Underwater Investigation | View video text only (3)
    This course presents the history and principles of basic oceanography, physics, and physiology as they relate to exposure to compressed gas environments and how to deduce safe parameters from those principles. This course provides the theoretical foundation for individuals preparing to be scientific investigators underwater.
  • CJE3762 - Forensic Science in Investigation (3)
    This course combines various theories of the conduct of crime with knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity. The course emphasizes decision-making in forensic science examinations and evaluation of their reliability.
  • CJE3762L - Forensic Science in Investigation Laboratory (1)
    This course combines various theories of the conduct of crime with knowledge of how physical evidence is produced during the commission of a crime to produce information that enables the investigation and prosecution of criminal activity. The course emphasizes decision-making in forensic science examinations and evaluation of their reliability.
  • Criminal Investigation: Theory and Practice videoCJE4611 Criminal Investigation: Theory and Practice | View video text only (3)
    This course gives the student an opportunity to explore and understand investigative facets of law enforcement service delivery. The students focus on the historical relevance of the investigative process, the evolution of investigation, the procedural guidelines for effective investigations, and the mechanics of the modern day investigative process.
  • CJE4710 - Public Safety and Security Capstone (3-15)
    Prerequisite: CCJ3024, CCJ3071, CCJ3484 and CCJ4710.
    This course focuses on the integration of knowledge, skills, and capabilities learned in the program through a capstone project thought working with a Public Safety and Security Agency or Guided Research.
  • CLT2049 - Medical Terminology (3)
    This course introduces students to the medical and technical vocabulary based on Latin and Greek elements in medical Latin and English.
  • COM2080 - Online Communication & Presence (3)
    This course provides students with theoretical background and practical experience in constructing messages for online communication, as well as managing self-presentation and professional relationships in the online environment. The course includes critical analysis of information sources and audiences and the development and delivery of online oral presentations.
  • COM3332 - New Communication Technology & Contemporary Society (3)
    Relates the design, development, and the use of new communication technologies to social, economic, and policy implications.
  • COM4132 - Communication & Stress Management (3)
    Course provides practical education in controlling stress that emphasizes primarily organizational, intrapersonal, and interpersonal communication skills and utilizes primarily written channels.
  • COM4431 - Rhetoric of Global Corporation (3)
    This course provides opportunities to observe ways in which religious and musical rhetoric are employed by a major U.S. corporation with a global target market. The course emphasizes observation research that focuses primarily on communication theory and methods. The course requires that students spend forty-five documented hours performing lab/field work research and/or library research in the symbols and messages of an appropriate corporation.
  • COM5450 - Introduction to Project Management (3)
    This course covers the processes, tools and techniques for managing projects of any size while preparing students to sit for the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification exam.
  • COM5452 - Agile Project Management (3)
    This course covers the key concepts and approaches of Agile Project Management and prepares students to sit for the PMI-ACP certification exam.
  • COP3014 - Programming I (3)
    Prerequisite: MAC1140.
    This course covers fundamental concepts and skills of programming in a high-level language. Flow of control: sequence, selection, iteration, subprograms. Data structures: arrays, strings, structs, ADT lists and tables. Algorithms using selection and iteration (decision making, finding maxima and minima, basic searching and sorting, simulation, etc.). Good program design using a procedural paradigm, structure, and style are emphasized. Interactive and file IO. Testing and debugging techniques. Intended primarily for computer science or computer engineering majors, or anyone who is required to take COP 3330.
  • COP3252 - Internet Applications Programming with Java (3)
    Prerequisite: COP3330.
    This course covers the applications of the Java language to education, electronic commerce, scientific research, and distributed systems in general. Topics include the following: the architecture of the Web, including software and protocols for passing information in typical Web applications; introduction to the Java programming language; developing Graphical User Interfaces using Swing; an introduction to distributed objects using Java Remote Method Invocation (RMI); and server-side programming using Servlets and JDBC. Emphasis is placed on practical programming using these technologies.
  • COP3330 - Object Oriented Programming (3)
    Prerequisite: COP3014 or a comparable course in C or C++ programming.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: COP3353.
    This course focuses on object-oriented programming in a modern programming language; classes, objects, inheritance, and polymorphism; introduction to data structures and container classes.
  • COP3353 - Introduction to UNIX (1)
    This course for majors and non-majors offers an introduction to the UNIX operating system. Topics include: UNIX history, requesting UNIX accounts, logging into a UNIX system, basic operating system concepts and file structure, basic commands, text editor(s) (to include emacs, vi, and pico), printing, mail, and online help. The goals of this course are to enable students to log in to their UNIX accounts from any type of computer and to have a basic understanding of the commands and utilities.
  • COP4531 - Complexity and Analysis of Data Structures and Algorithms (3)
    Prerequisite: COP4530 AND MAD3105.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: STA3032, or STA4442.
    This course is an analysis of the complexity of algorithms, including sorting, searching, and graph algorithms; use and implementation of graphs.
  • COP4813 - Web Applications Programming (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: COP 3252.
    This course teaches programming of distributed Web applications using Java Database Connectivity, Servlets, Java Server Pages, Remote Method Invocation, and Enterprise Java Beans (both session and entity beans). Use of the Sun Microsystems Java 2 Enterprise Edition development platform either directly or through an Integrated Development Environment such as IBM's Websphere is also covered.
  • CPO3615 - Post-Soviet Politics (3)
    Prerequisite: CPO2002 or instructor permission.
    This course examines developments in the so-called 'transition countries' of Eastern Europe and Eurasia, drawing on readings to introduce students to the major debates on economic and political reform in the region.
  • CPO5429 - Political Islam (3)
    This course focuses on seeking to understand the emergence, evolution and possible futures of what is commonly called political Islam. Students examine the crucial interplay between local and global forces shaping Muslim politics as a lived reality in todays world.
  • DSC5595 - Human Intelligence Collection (3)
    This course examines techniques utilized to collect intelligence from confidential sources, assets and cooperating witnesses through interviewing, interrogation and elicitation. Students are also exposed to various methods to vet Human Sources and to uncover infiltration by hostile agencies and/or criminal organizations.
  • ECO2000 - Introduction to Economics (3)
    This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
  • ECO2013 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
  • ECO2023 - Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
  • ECO3223 - Financial Markets, the Banking Systemm and Monetary Policy (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO2023.
    This course explores the functions of money, bank creation of deposits, and credit; Federal Reserve control of money supply; and monetary theory and policy questions.
  • ECO3431 - Analysis of Economic Data (3)
    This course provides basic skills in finding, downloading, displaying, graphing, and analyzing economics data. Topics include locating data sources, graphics methods, such as data smoothing and interpolation, basic statistics, and bivariate and multivariate regression.
  • ECO4713 - International Finance (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2013. ECO3223 or ECO4203 is recommended. ECO2023. ECO2023.
    This course focuses on the balance of payments; disequilibrium and adjustments; birth, evolution, and demise of the Bretton Woods System; the managed float; international monetary reform; multinational corporations.
  • ECP3010 - Economics of Art and Culture (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2013. ECO2023.
    This course allows students to use traditional economic analysis of supply and demand to examine the markets for "high art". Students discover in the class that many of the standard approaches to economic analysis apply to these markets, but there are also features of the art markets that are unique.
  • ECS3200 - Economics of Asia (3)
    This course is a survey of economic development in the economies of East Asia. The course includes an economic analysis of the factors that contributed to the substantial growth in East Asia from 1960-1989 and the subsequent financial crisis that ensued in the 1990s.
  • EDA5219 - Resource Management for Educational Leaders (3)
    This course examines public education as an economic institution, emphasizing the relationship between the purposes of schooling and the human and fiscal-resource allocation role of the principal. The principal's role in selected strategies and techniques in critical thinking and problem solving as applied to school improvement are presented. Procedures involved in school funding are examined, as well as the role of the principal in implementing statutes, audits, procedures, and policies. Recruitment, selection, retention of school personnel, and collective bargaining are examined as they relate to state and federal law.
  • EDA5232 - Legal Aspects of Public School Administration (3)
    This course is designed to enable students to identify and apply legal principles that place limits on authority, define individual and corporate liability and inform standards of educational practice in public school settings. It emphasizes knowledge, analysis, and application that explores a range of leadership competencies, including concept formation, organizational sensitivity, problem solving and decisiveness. The course includes readings offering an overview of key legal and ethical issues for school administrators and case scenarios designed for small group and individual analysis.
  • EDA5423 - Data Driven School Improvement (3)
    This course builds expertise in using data for a variety of school-improvement purposes, including instructional decision-making in grades K-12. Collaborative action-research skills are developed to solve school-based problems.
  • EDA5503 - The Principalship (3)
    This course provides a systemic approach to leadership and management roles, responsibilities, opportunities, and challenges of school principals.
  • EDA5504 - Instructional Leadership (3)
    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the ways school leaders bring multiple resources such as teachers, parents, the community, programs, professional development, the schedule, and supervision together to focus on curriculum, instruction, and student achievement.
  • EDA5507 - Planning Effective Instruction (3)
    This course explores the components and relationships that make up effective classroom instruction. Working on the assumption that effective classroom instruction is a necessary foundation for student achievement, school leaders need to know how to coach and monitor teachers use of effective instructional practices.
  • EDA5508 - Teacher Leadership Development (3)
    This course is based on the increasingly important role of a school leader in identifying and developing teacher leaders in K-12 schools. School leaders need to be able to work with teacher teams effectively as well as cultivate the talents of teachers as leaders in various aspects of school life. This course explores the dynamics of teacher leadership development in schools today and how school leaders can be prepared to cultivate this important resource.
  • EDA6061 - Educational Administration and Organizational Practice (3)
    Prerequisite: n.
    This course provides an introduction to educational administration and organizational practice for graduate students interested in education and policy. The course is composed of a social-systems model of which critical elements such as structure, motivation, culture and politics are covered. Opportunities and constraints for schools are explored along with key administrative processes and contemporary research on the effectiveness of schools.
  • EDF4210 - Educational Psychology: Developing Learners (3)
    Prerequisite: n.
    This course is designed to introduce students to concepts of human development, learning, and motivation as foundations for the planning and implementation of classroom instruction. Students are expected to acquire and use theoretical knowledge to inform decisions about strategies for helping learners develop, learn, and achieve.
  • EDF5400 - Basic Descriptive and Inferential Statistics Applications (4)
    This course prepares students to both read and write papers containing basic statistical analyses. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, basic plots and graphing, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlational techniques, and introduction to the general linear model.
  • EDF5442 - Inquiry and Measurement for Practitioners (3)
    Prerequisite: y.
    This foundational course addresses inquiry and measurement concepts for master's students. It focuses on inquiry to support data-based decision makingprocesses related to learning and human performance.
  • EDF5461 - Introduction to Program Evaluation (3)
    This course is an overview of current evaluation theory and models; emphasis on role evaluation in needs assessment and planning phase of program development.
  • EDF5462 - Evaluation of New Educational Programs and Practices (3)
    This course is an advanced level seminar on the theoretical and pragmatic aspects of program evaluation. Students begin with an overview and understanding of evaluation theoretical roots and the philosophical premises shaping evaluation theory. This leads to further understandings about the application of different research designs to the practice of evaluation, as presented in evaluation cases.
  • EDF5481 - Methods of Educational Research (3)
    This course is a survey of selected types of educational research and appropriate related techniques; emphasis on criteria of validity.
  • EDF5916 - Research Proposal Writing (1)
    This course provides the opportunity to develop a written research proposal (including literature review) and to select and specify the appropriate research design and data collection methods to answer one's research questions.
  • EDF5941 - Institutional Research Practicum (8)
    This course is the capstone course for the Certificate in Institutional Research. In this course, students use theory and knowledge from previous courses in the Certificate Program to address a practical issue or problem in Institutional Research.
  • EDF5942 - Field Laboratory Internship (1-8)
    May be repeated to a maximum of twenty-four semester hours.
  • EDG5206 - Teachers and Curriculum Development (3)
    This course explores the challenges of curricular design from the institutional role of the teacher and analyzes how a teacher can become an effective contributor in curricular deliberation within the settings of schools and school districts.
  • EDG5339 - Making Sense of Data to Inform Instruction (3)
    This course is designed to support educators in exploring the concepts underlying the use of data to inform instructional strategies. The course provides an understanding of accountability systems and the wide range of data collection tools, and supports the development of educators' skills in basic data analysis procedures, data interpretation, and application of these interpretations to shape instructional practice in classrooms and other educational settings.
  • EDH5042 - Student Success In College (3)
    Prerequisite: n.
    This course examines the theories and research on student success and explores effective policies, programs, and practices that can be adopted to promote student success in higher education.
  • EDH5647 - Data Analysis for Institutional Research (3)
    This course focuses on key functions in Excel and SPSS for an IR office. In particular, students learn pivot tables, t-tests, regression, and commonly used formulas in Excel. Assignments are in Excel and replicated on SPSS so that students could perform the analysis in either software. Using institutional research data from IPEDS or other data sources, students learn how to complete and interpret an analysis that is appropriate for an IR office and campus stakeholders. Access to SPSS is required and is the student's responsibility. A prerequisite to this course is a basic understanding of statistics as statistics is not taught.
  • EEX4070 - Including Students with Disabilities in the General Education Curriculum (3)
    This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills to include students with disabilities in the general education curriculum by adapting instruction and assessment procedures and processes.
  • EEX4770 - Study of Human Exceptionality (3)
    This course increases learner knowledge and awareness of the characteristics and needs of people with exceptionalities, and acquaints learners with the resources, issues, and trends related to appropriately meeting these needs.
  • EEX5708 - Teaming with Families, Schools and the Community (3)
    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to collaborate and team with professionals from a variety of disciplines in the schools and other community agencies, to include family members in the collaboration process, and to support families of children with disabilities throughout the life cycle.
  • EME2040 - Introduction to Educational Technology (3)
    This course is an introduction to the use of educational technology in teaching and learning. Students learn to use personal computers and other technology for communication, presentations, and resource acquisition.
  • EME5603 - Introduction to Systematic Instructional Design (3)
    This course is an introduction to systematic design of instruction. Includes practical experience in developing and evaluating instructional materials.
  • EME6403 - Designing for Online Collaborative Learning (3)
    This course teaches strategies and techniques for designing instructional activities for distance learning based on theories and principles of collaborative learning.
  • EME6631 - Managing Instructional Development (3)
    This course is an introduction to procedures for managing instructional development projects and organizations. Includes project and organizational design and development, staff development, and leadership principles.
  • ENC2135 - Research, Genre, and Context (3)
    Prerequisite: ENC1101.
    This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
  • ENT3003 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
    This course exposes students to the knowledge and skills required to be a successful entrepreneur. Topics include challenges of entrepreneurship, marketing and financial concerns, and management issues.
  • ENT3173 - Franchising (3)
    Prerequisite: ENT3003 or both ENT2010 and ENT2011.
    This course focuses on the special role of franchising as a form of entrepreneurship in the U.S. and international economies. Topics include success rates of franchisors and franchisees, advantages and disadvantages of franchising for both franchisors and franchisees, the process of franchising a business idea, and the process of selecting and working with a franchisor.
  • ENT3423 - Funding Sources for Entrepreneurial Opportunities (3)
    Prerequisite: ENT3003 or both ENT2010 and ENT2011.
    This course covers various aspects of financing an entrepreneurial venture. Major topics include attracting seed and growth capital from sources such as venture capital, investment banking, government, and commercial banks. Among the issues discussed are valuing a company, going public, selling out, acquisitions, bankruptcy, different legal forms of organization, partnerships, and taxes.
  • ENT4114 - New Venture Creation (3)
    This course gives students the opportunity to complete a business plan for the creation of a new venture. In the process of development, they identify new or emerging opportunities for providing goods or services, demonstrate the need for such goods or services through market research, and develop financial statements for the proposed venture.
  • ENT4943 - Entrepreneurship Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: ENT2010, ENT2011, and ENT3003.
    This course is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the Entrepreneurship field through on-the-job-practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional and the Director of Internships and Career Services.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • EUH3205 - 19th-Century Europe (3)
    This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.
  • EVI5131 - Teaching Individuals with Deafblindness (3)
    Prerequisite: y.
    This course teaches students skills and knowledge to teach deaf-blind/multisensory impaired individuals. It is designed to provide knowledge related to the education of children with multiple impairments involving sensory loss. The course will include a historical perspective, pathology, the sensory systems and their relation to development and intervention strategies, and professional issues.
  • EVR1001 - Introduction to Environmental (3)
    This course is an introduction to environmental science that covers the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.
  • EVR1001L - Environmental Science Laboratory (3)
    This course is an introduction to environmental science that covers the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system lab.
  • FAD2230 - Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3)
    This course examines the dynamics of contemporary family life and interpersonal relationships in a changing society and over the life course.
  • FAD3220 - Individual and Family Life Span Development (3)
    This course is an analysis of individual and family development as it applies to professional application in human services.
  • FAD3343 - Contexts of Adult Development and Aging (3)
    Prerequisite: CHD2220 .
    This course examines the developmental processes related to cognitive, physical, and psychosocial changes during adulthood, the associated challenges, and the influences of various contexts in which adults are embedded, such as families and communities.
  • FAD3432 - Stress and Resilience in Individuals and Families (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Admission to the major..
    This course provides undergraduate majors with an introduction to family-based, stress-focused mini-theories. The course provides a framework for understanding the differences between family patterns when families are centered on growth related themes and when they are pre-occupied with a variety of stressor events.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • FAD4265 - Family Diversity (3)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CHD 2220, FAD 2230, FAD 3343, and CHD 3243..
    This course is designed to expose students to the diversity of families by race, ethnicity, social class, and structures in an ego-systemic context.
  • Practicum in Family and Child Science videoFAD4805 Practicum in Family and Child Science | View video text only (6)
    Prerequisite: Major status. Also, at least four additional major courses, and FAD 4932 (completed the semester before enrolling in FAD 4805)
    This course is designed to provide students with experiences in a community setting serving children, youth, and families and the opportunity to apply course material to the work environment.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • Pre-Professional Development videoFAD4932 Pre-Professional Development | View video text only (1)
    Prerequisite: Major status and senior standing.
    This course is designed to expose students to career opportunities in FCS and professional/ethical behavior and to prepare them for placement in agencies/organizations serving individuals and families.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • FIN3244 - Financial Markets, Institutions, and International Finance Systems (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG2021 and ECO2013.
    This course focuses on money and capital markets, financial institutions, financial systems, and financial environment including an introduction to investments. Emphasizes the microfinancial decision-making process of the business firm.
  • FIN3403 - Financial Management of the Firm (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG2021 and ECO2013.
    This course is an examination of the basic concepts involved in the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the business firm. Managerial orientation with emphasis on identification, analysis, and solution of financial problems confronting the firm.
  • FIN4941 - Finance Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.
    This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the finance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • FIN5425 - Problems in Financial Management (3)
    Prerequisite: ACG5026.
    An advanced case course including in-depth study of selected topics such as valuation theory and the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the firm.
  • FIN5515 - Investment Management & Analysis (3)
    Prerequisite: FIN5425.
    Analysis of financial assets with emphasis on the securities market, the valuation of individual securities, and portfolio management.
  • GEA1000 - World Geography (3)
    This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEB3213 - Business Communications (3)
    This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • GEB4941 - Business Internship (1-6)
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
    This business internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the accounting field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • GEB5944 - Graduate Internship (1-6)
    This internship offers a working and learning experience in the business industry. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • GEO1330 - Environmental Science (3)
    This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
  • GEO1400 - Human Geography (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of geographic theories, issues and applications from the human perspective. The course discusses how people interact with each other politically, economically, culturally and socially across distances, scales and within various physical environments. In addition, global contrasts are examined using urban versus rural habitation, local versus transnational trade, and uneven economic development.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • GEO2200C - Physical Geography (3)
    This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
  • GEO4210 - Landforms and Landscapes (3)
    This course is on the spatial distribution of geomorphic landforms across landscapes: how they form, how they change over time, how they are designated, and their nomenclature. Emphasis is given to how humans interact with these landscapes and how these landscapes can impact human habitation.
  • GEO4300 - Biogeography (3)
    This course examines the spatial distributions of flora and fauna, ecosystem change, and human interventions such as logging, invasive species, and wilderness preservation.
  • GEO4412 - Environment and Gender (3)
    In this course, students look at how physical space (be it national boundaries or public parks) and the terrain of the symbolic realm are sometimes at odds. Included in this investigation is the examination of how ideas of gender, place and space affect individuals' experiences and how said experiences are created and limited by ideas of space at various geographical scales and contrasts between more and less economically developed nations.
  • GEO4450 - Medical Geography (3)
    This course applies geographical concepts and techniques to health-related problems, including the ecology of health, disease diffusion, medical cartography, and health care access.
  • GIS2040 - Essentials of GIS (3)
    This course is an introduction of the basic principles and techniques of geographic information systems (GIS) for students with no or rudimentary knowledge of geographic concepts and practices.
  • GIS3015 - Map Analysis (3)
    This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.
  • HFT1000 - Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management (3)
    This course offers an introductory review of the segments, disciplines, career opportunities, and current issues in the hospitality industry.
  • HFT2061 - Ales, Lagers and International Culture (3)
    This course is an introduction to ales and lagers of the world with a focus upon their importance to global cultures found in many regions. Students learn about these regional beers and the interrelation with their culture, including food, heritage, and festivals.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • HFT2062 - International Wine and Culture (3)
    This course provides an introduction to wines of the world with a focus upon the importance to global cultures. Students learn about these regional wines and the interrelationship with their cultures and heritage.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • HFT2452 - Hospitality Supply Management (3)
    This course introduces the importance of how proper hospitality supply management can lead to hospitality business success. Understanding the relationship between what supplies are needed, negotiations and bidding processes for obtaining competitive pricing, balancing inventory with consumer demand, developing and maintaining business relationships through the supply chain, and the proper sales process are emphasized in this class content. The course is open to all majors within the university.
  • HFT2890 - International Food and Culture (3)
    This course explores the world's cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, as well as various cooking methods and terminology from places such as Latin and South America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Scandinavia, India, and Asia.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • HFT3240 - Managing Service Organizations (3)
    This course is an in-depth examination of the concept of service and the linkages of the three most important functional areas of the firm: marketing, operations, and human resources. The course also addresses the concept of quality.
  • HUM3321 - Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)
    This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. Students benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.
  • HUN1201 - The Science of Nutrition (3)
    This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
  • HUN4362 - Functional Food and Health (3)
    Prerequisite: HUN1201.
    This course focuses on what makes a food or a food product functional, chemistry, bioavailability, and health benefits of various functional foods.
  • IFS2073 - World Music (3)
    This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture.
  • Art and the Environment videoIFS3129 Art and the Environment | View video text only (3)
    This course provides an introduction into the theories and creative processes that propel environmental art and design. Students explore a wide range of creative media, methods, and themes used by visual artists and designers that address the environment. By analyzing, discussing and writing about environmental art and design, students develop an enhanced awareness of the complexities faced globally and gather perspectives on the ways artists attempt to affect change. For non-art majors.
  • Contemporary Art As A Mirror videoIFS3140 Contemporary Art As A Mirror | View video text only (3)
    This course identifies the cultural landscape that artists are currently exploring and discusses a variety of artists? works to explore and critically analyze the ways that art can function as a mirror of contemporary society.
  • ISM3003 - Foundations of Management Information Systems (3)
    Prerequisite: CGS2518.
    This course is an overview of the MIS profession and the role of MIS in organizations. Topics include the introduction to fundamental techniques and methods used in the analysis of business processes for which computer-based information systems are designed and managed.
  • ISM3541 - Introduction to Business Analytics (3)
    This course provides students with an introduction to basic business analytics concepts and applications. The course covers the principles of data analytic thinking and provide a solid foundation for data driven decision making in various business and organizational settings. The course places special emphasis on working through applications and examples of analytics in the real world.
  • ISM4941 - Field Study in Management Information Systems (1-3)
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
    This course provides students with learning opportunities in the organizational management information systems environments beyond those available in existing MIS courses. No more than three credit hours allowed in a semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • ISM5021 - Information & Technology Management (3)
    This course examines a range of topics that present managerial challenges unique to technology-oriented environments. Topics include new technology convergence, the management of technology that disrupts existing industries, measuring new technology impacts, and business continuity planning, among others.
  • ISM5315 - Project Management (3)
    This course has been designed to be relevant for all professionals confronting project-related tasks, with particular attention given to the information systems context.
  • ISM5327 - Corporate Information Security (3)
    This course examines corporate information security from several perspectives. Topics include differences in security of physical versus digital assets; sources of security threats; solutions involving technology, people, and policy; and proper responses to attacks on digital assets.
  • ISM5428 - Knowledge Management & Business Intelligence (3)
    This course examines knowledge management and business intelligence from an organizational perspective covering principles of knowledge management and business intelligence.
  • ISS4304 - Contemporary Social Problems (3)
    This course is designed to introduce the benefits and methods of interdisciplinary research and study. This course uses multiple and interrelated perspectives to identify and explore social issues and problems. Students are guided through the process of building interdisciplinary perspectives to maximize cognitive skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • LAW5000 - Contracts (2)
    This course explores substantive and remedial aspects of business agreements including offer, acceptance, consideration, assignments, third-party beneficiaries, statute of frauds, legality, performance, and remedies.
  • LAW5522 - Legislation and Regulation (2)
    This course introduces students to creation, interpretation, and application of statutes and regulations, and explains the central role that they play in modern American governance.
  • LAW5700 - Torts (2)
    This course focuses on civil liability for harm to persons and property, including intentional torts and privileges thereto; negligence, causation, and defenses; strict liability, products liability, defamation, privacy, and interference with advantageous relationships. Required course.
  • LAW6548 - Employment Law for HR Compliance (2)
    This course provides a basic overview of employment law as it relates to day-to-day employment practices. Students are guided through the entire employer-employee relationship?from the initial decision to fill a position to the ultimate decision to terminate the employment relationship.The course also offers guidance on how employers can minimize their potential liability in the workplace.
  • LAW6856 - Regulatory Compliance (2)
    This course introduces basic statutes, regulation, and administrative practices relevant to regulatory compliance by business entities, financial institutions, and healthcare organizations and practitioners. The course also introduces students to basic concepts of risk management.
  • LAW6866 - Bank Secrecy Act/Anti-Money Laundering Compliance (4)
    This course introduces students to Bank Secrecy Act and Anti-Money Laundering regulations and gives context to how processes for compliance with those requirements help financial institutions detect, prevent, investigate, and report financial crimes. The course studies statutory and regulatory requirements for record-keeping and reporting, sharing information with law enforcement and industry, and performing initial and ongoing due diligence over higher risk products, customers, and services.
  • LAW6870 - Advanced Legal Research for Legal Risk Management and HR Compliance (2)
    This course introduces students to effective legal research techniques used in legal risk management and HR compliance in business entities. This course provides students with practical hands-on experience with legal resources and research tools. This course emphasizes building the practical research skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex legal and regulatory environment.
  • LAW6875 - Broker-Dealer Regulation (2)
    This course provides an overview of the statutes and regulations governing broker-dealers. The course begins with a review of the foundational federal laws that regulate the securities industry and the sale of securities in the United States. The course covers topics such as broker-dealer registration, self-regulation, obligations of broker-dealers, and regulation of financial markets.
  • LAW6876 - Conducting Workplace Investigations (2)
    This course examines the major regulations governing the workplace and the legal and practical approaches to planning, conducting, and documenting internal workplace investigations of employee complaints and suspected employee misconduct.
  • LAW6877 - Drug Regulation and Compliance (2)
    This course provides an analysis of major legal issues in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. The course explores the FDA's regulation of these industries, including the FDA approval process, advertising and promotional regulations, and enforcement by the FDA and other regulatory entities. Other topics include product liability and FDA preemption, research, patient care and privacy, pricing and market access.
  • LAW6878 - Economic Sanctions (2)
    This course examines the economic sanctions laws administered by the U.S. Treasury Department?s Office of Foreign Assets Control (?OFAC?). This course explores OFAC requirements for financial institutions? compliance programs, including risk assessment to identify high-risk areas and development of appropriate internal controls for screening and reporting. This course also considers OFAC examination of financial institutions? compliance programs, as well as OFAC enforcement actions.
  • LDR2101 - Leadership Theory and Practice (3)
    This course is designed to inspire, teach, and engage students in the process of learning leadership. The course introduces students to leadership theory and helps them understand their unique role in leadership on campus, in their academic discipline, and within our larger society.
  • LDR2560 - Leadership in Film (3)
    This course initiates a thoughtful consideration of the nature of leadership as depicted in film. Film provides unique insights to investigate character and motive, as well as culture, allowing students to access meaning and significance through theoretical, analytic and dialogic inquiry.
  • LDR3263 - Leadership Experience (3)
    This experiential-based course offers participants an opportunity to put into practice the knowledge, theory, and skills they have learned in previous courses in the Certification program. Students select and create an experience, complete an experiential learning contract for the course, and do extensive reflection on their experience throughout the course.
  • LEI4524 - Leadership and Supervision in Recreation, Tourism and Events (3)
    This course introduces the concepts, principles, and best practices for leading and supervising employees of recreation, sport, and leisure service organizations.
  • LEI4864 - Technology for Events (3)
    Prerequisite: n.
    This course introduces the student to the variety of ways computer applications and other technologies are used in the planning, design, marketing, and evaluation of events.
  • LEI4921 - Fieldwork in Recreation, Tourism, and Events (3)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to gain practical experience by working in an organized recreation, parks, tourism or special event agency. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • LEI5563 - Event Marketing (3)
    This course focuses on the components required for development of marketing plans for the various venues in the special events industry, including sponsorship acquisition.
  • LEI5942 - Practicum in Events Management (3)
    Prerequisite: LEI5316. LEI5317. LEI5563.
    This course provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed during their academic preparation. The course aims to help students gain valuable experience in management of events. Students complete a minimum of 150 hours over an extended period of time, but not less than twelve weeks.
  • LIS2360 - Web Applications Development (3)
    Prerequisite: CGS2821 or any equivalent course in web design (HTML and CSS) or instructor permission.
    This course introduces the concepts and technical needs of client and server side technologies for web applications. The course equips students with resources for design, production, and evaluation of web applications and strategies for locating these resources. Students gain hands-on experience in web application production, including: client-side markup and programming, server-side programming for data processing, code versioning, accessing web services and related authentication techniques.
  • LIS3267 - Information Science (3)
    This course presents the history, philosophical bases, concepts, theories and methodologies of information science. It also emphasizes the definitions and properties of information, formal and informal information systems, information origination, transfer, classification, formatting and use.
  • LIS4708 - Perspectives on Information Technology (3)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor permission.
    This is the capstone course in the Information Technology degree program. The course provides students with a broad perspective on the information technology field, the skills required to succeed in the field, and a familiarity with emerging technologies. It also allows students to complete their information technology portfolio. The course consists of a combination of discussions of issues in the information technology profession, emerging technologies, and directed work on the student's degree portfolio.
  • LIS4910 - Information Technology Project (3)
    This course consists of students working in teams and individually to manage, design, implement, and evaluate an information technology project. Students are also given evaluation and guidance on improving artifacts from projects entered into their degree portfolio during other courses within the degree program.
  • LIS4940 - Internship in Information Technology (1-6)
    This course provides students with opportunities to test theory in practice and to gain work experience in a real information technology environment. Specifically, students work under the guidance and supervision of a professional in an organization that provides information technology services. This work is guided by individualized learning objectives designed to accommodate the student's background and career objectives as agreed upon by the site supervisor, the internship coordinator, and the student. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • LIS5020 - Foundations of the Information Professions (3)
    This course provides background information about the information profession and aims to facilitate optimal information management. Topics include librarianship, the disciplines of library-information science (LIS) and of information technology (IT), the organizations and institutions of the information-provision environment, as well as the applications of technology to information provision.
  • LIS5203 - Assessing Information Needs (3)
    Provides students with an overview of the user's perspective in the analysis of information needs and preferences. Provides the fundamentals to a broad approach, emphasizing a unifying structure, to understand human information seeking behaviors.
  • LIS5271 - Research in Information Studies (3)
    This is an introductory course in applied research methods in the social sciences with a particular emphasis on information studies. It provides an overview of the basic issues and methods that information professionals should consider when collecting, analyzing, and evaluating data regarding information programs and services. The course covers scientific inquiry, research ethics, problem formulation, measurement, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods and analysis. It also provides a foundation for evaluating a variety of scientific, technical, business, and government information and for conducting applied research in information-based organizations. This course is appropriate for students with no background in research or analytical methods.
  • LIS5275 - Usability Analysis (3)
    Design, execution, and reporting of tests for the usability of information products and services. Covers cost justifying assessments and concepts of human cognition relevant to information processing.
  • LIS5362 - Design & Production of Network Multimedia (3)
    Examines the theory, concepts and techniques for designing, producing, and evaluating networked multimedia resources to meet specific information needs. Students engage in collaborative design projects applying theoretical constructs from communication, education, engineering, graphic design, and information science to the provision of resources using multimedia network technologies.
  • LIS5385 - Social Media Management (3)
    This course focuses on social media - specifically we focus on the tools, information management and communication functions through hands-on work with designing and managing social media sites. Students participating in this class will actively design, implement, and coordinate numerous projects that build a foundation in social media while allowing students to gain valuable leadership, communication, and organizational skills.
  • LIS5405 - Leadership in Technology (3)
    This course introduces students to the leadership concepts necessary to build successful information technology infrastructures in a variety of contexts. Through the course, students develop an understanding of IT leadership careers, the roles and responsibilities of IT leaders, evidence-based methods for developing leadership strategies, and how to lead innovative and entrepreneurial technology development in fast-paced environments. The course challenges students to engage in active planning of their careers through the development of leadership vision statements and personal action plans.
  • LIS5408 - Management of Information Organizations (3)
    This course enables students to develop a conceptual framework for integrating fundamental management concepts, principles, theories, and practices into an effective, personal management process that relates to information organizations of the 21st century.
  • LIS5411 - Introduction to Information Policy (3)
    This course examines selected fundamental policy questions regarding information and communications, with special attention to intricate policy issues such as information ownership rights, privacy rights, and public access to information. The course examines such issues by focusing on the underlying constitutional principles, laws and regulations, statutes, and government policies that impact such issues. Specific attention is given to federal policies within the United States but state and local policies are examined as needed. Specific course topics include universal service, information equity, privacy, intellectual property, censorship, e-government, and information management. The course focuses on providing information professionals with a fundamental understanding of the importance and impact of information policy.
  • LIS5418 - Introduction to Health Informatics (3)
    This survey course evaluates medical informatics from a stakeholder perspective. Beginning with a brief overview of the US health care system, the focus then shifts to understanding to what extent health information needs are met using technology for users such as providers of health care services, clinician educators, consumers, and caregivers.
  • LIS5426 - Grant Writing, Evaluation, and Administration (3)
    This course develops basic skills in planning, evaluation, and financial management, as well as application of these aspects to the overall management task in the information organization.
  • LIS5484 - Introduction to Data Networks for Information Professionals (3)
    This course discusses networking and telecommunications technologies, and management of modern data networks, with emphasis on the building blocks of local and wide area networks. Subjects covered include networking architectures, topologies, models, layers, protocols, IP sub netting, equipment, operating systems, security and various tools and utilities. Also covered are economic and policy issues inherent to telecommunications, and management skills that the professional in this field need to master.
  • LIS5485 - Introduction to Information Technology (3)
    This course introduces students to Information Technology (IT) on a theoretical and practical level. The course reviews the underlying concepts of IT as embodied in operating systems, hardware, application software, website creation and networks. It ensures that all students have mastered minimum skills and knowledge sets and are prepared to carry out assignments requiring IT skills through the program.
  • LIS5487 - Information Systems Management (3)
    An introduction to the role of information systems in organizations and how they relate to organizational objectives and structures. Covers the basics of management and information as they relate to each other in the operation of an information center.
  • LIS5511 - Management of Information Collections (3)
    Prerequisite: No.
    This course covers the principles of collection development and intelligence gathering, including selection, acquisition, distribution, circulation, preservation, and de-selection of information resources in academic, public, and special library environments.
  • LIS5565 - Information Needs of Young Adults (3)
    Study of media for young adults in relation to their characteristics, needs, interests and abilities. Evaluation and use of print and audiovisual materials.
  • LIS5576 - Information Needs of Adults (3)
    Selection criteria, aids in selection and evaluation of materials relative to adult needs, publishing and production trends. Emphasis is on contemporary print and non-print materials for public library collections.
  • LIS5590 - Museum Informatics (3)
    Provides an introduction to the study of how technical innovations influence the social world of museums by exploring the nature of information technology in museums and the way modern information systems have shaped the museum environment.
  • LIS5602 - Marketing of Library and Information Services (3)
    The course covers concepts, techniques, and illustrations needed to develop first-rate nonprofit marketing skills for libraries and information services. These skills facilitate cost-effective and customer-centered strategic planning.
  • LIS5603 - Introduction to Information Services (3)
    This course is an introduction to reference work using both print and online sources. Also addresses the relationship of reference work to other information services in libraries and other information-providing agencies.
  • LIS5703 - Information Organization (3)
    This course establishes the conceptual and theoretical framework for organizing and retrieving information, including the study of systems, their objectives and structures, formats, standards, and vocabularies. The course also covers the information object and its relationship to organizing systems and to other information objects.
  • LIS5736 - Indexing and Abstracting (3)
    This course takes a practical approach to indexing and abstracting. The course covers manual and automatic processes and methods of abstracting and indexing, database organization and design. The course places emphasis on subject access, indexing, and abstracting in an online environment with attention to production rules, standards, and file organization.
  • LIS5782 - Database Management Systems (3)
    Examines the basic principles, elements and concepts of design, implementation and utilization of database management systems. Within database management systems, treats various models of data and databases. Also considers the administrative tasks associated in the database management environment.
  • LIS5788 - Management of Health Information Technology (3)
    This is an introductory course in management of Health Information Technology (HIT) within a variety of organizational contexts. It is designed to develop a conceptual framework for intergrating fundamental HIT management concepts, policies, theories, and practices into an effective personal management process that relates to health related organizations.
  • LIS5945 - Internship (1-12)
    This course is an opportunity to learn how library and/or information studies principles and techniques are applied in a professional setting. A minimum of forty-five hours on the job per semester hour earned is required. May be repeated within the same term to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • MAD2104 - Discrete Mathematics I (3)
    Prerequisite: MAC2311 or COP3014 and MAC1140. Recommended Prerequisite: MAC2311
    This course covers techniques of definition and logical argument, sets and functions, propositional logic, introduction to graphs and relations, and applications. Mathematics majors should take MGF 3301 instead of MAD 2104.
  • MAE5691 - Mathematics Learning and Teaching (3)
    This course introduces students to those theories of learning that have been historically influential, or which have the potential to be currently influential, in the learning and teaching of mathematics.
  • MAN3025 - Concepts of Management (3)
    This course introduces the nature and process of management, with emphasis upon management of physical and human resources. (Credit not allowed for business majors.)
  • MAN3240 - Organizational Behavior (3)
    This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
  • MAN4701 - Business & Society (3)
    Prerequisite: MAN3240.
    This course is an examination of current and future issues in business and society with emphasis on the social responsibility of business and future challenges for business in a pluralistic society.
  • MAN4720 - Strategic Management & Business Policy (3)
    This course is a case analysis of business and management problems for the formulation of managerial strategies and policies.
  • MAN4941 - Field Study in Management (1-3)
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
    This course provides students with on-the-job experience in major area.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • MAN5501 - Operations Management (3)
    This course is a graduate survey of international business. Concepts of international economics blended with the marketing of goods and services in international markets. Current international events discussed.
  • MAN5716 - Business Conditions Analysis (3)
    This course covers problems of managing the firm in relation to the changing economic environment. Analysis of major business fluctuations and development of forecasting techniques.
  • MAR3023 - Basic Marketing Concepts (3)
    Prerequisite: ECO2023 and one behavioral science course.
    This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • MAR3231 - Retail Management (3)
    This course is an intensive training in the rudiments of retail operations.
  • MAR4941 - Marketing Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: Consent of internship director or sales program director. MAR 3023 and six hours of additional coursework in Marketing.
    This course is a marketing internship designed for marketing majors who want to gain real world experience in the marketing field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor and the internship director.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • MAR4946 - Professional Sales Practicum (3)
    Prerequisite: Consent of internship director or sales program director. MAR3023, MAR3400, and one other sales course.
    This course is designed for Professional Sales majors who want to gain real-world experience through one of three options: (1) on the job practice, i.e., a sales internship, (2) strategic account management, i.e., a faculty-directed study of sales research techniques, or (3) a professional sales competition, with the permission of the sales program director.
  • MAR5409 - Business-to-Business Sales & Marketing (3)
    This course focuses on building and managing relationships with business customers. It will cover business-to-business management issues, with an emphasis on topics at the mid-to-upper management level.
  • MAR5465 - Purchasing & Supply Chain Management (3)
    The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the ideas and concepts of Purchasing and Supply Chain Management function in organizational settings.
  • MET1010 - Introduction to the Atmosphere (3)
    This course covers the structure of the atmosphere; weather processes and weather systems, including climatic processes. Credit may not be received in this course if student has already received credit in 2000-level or higher MET courses.
  • MMC2000 - Introduction to the Mass Media (3)
    A historical and social overview of the mass media and their relationship to the mass communication process in a modern society.
  • MMC4300 - Diffusion of Innovations (3)
    An analysis of the process of change in developing countries and across cultures, particularly from the standpoint of how communication is used in the introduction, spread and adoption of new ideas.
  • MUH5219 - Graduate Survey of Music History (2)
    This course is a synoptic review of the history of music from Greek music to the present day and is required of all graduate music majors unless exempted by examination. Credit earned in MUH 5219 does not apply to credit hour requirements of any degree in the College of Music.
  • MUL2010 - Music Literature, Listening, and Understanding (3)
    This course is an introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. The course also develops a knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.
  • NGR5056C - Advanced Psychiatric Assessment and Diagnostics (3)
    Prerequisite: Admission into the Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing certificate program.
    This course provides students with a knowledge base in mental health assessment of clients across the life span within the context of the advanced psychiatric mental health nursing role. Emphasis is on the acquisition and analysis of relevant data for the development of a comprehensive and holistic mental health assessment and subsequent diagnoses. Focus is on history taking, analysis, data categories, and specific techniques used to identify mental health problems and differential diagnoses in clients across the life span.
  • NGR5102 - Theoretical Constructs for Nursing Science (3)
    This course is designed to assist the learner in analyzing and evaluating selected theories appropriate for advanced-practice nursing. Topics cover the relationship between theory, practice, and research; sources of theory for the discipline; contributions and philosophies of early nurse leaders and theorists, as well as those from other disciplines that are appropriate to health care; the development and evaluation of nursing knowledge and theory; as well as the analysis and application of theories and models in nursing practice, education, administration, and research.
  • NGR5140 - Advanced Pathophysiological Concepts in Nursing Science (4)
    Prerequisite: BSC2085. BSC2085L. BSC2086. BSC2086L.
    This course is designed to acquaint the nursing graduate student with the principals of pathophysiology appropriate to entry-level graduate work.
  • NGR5508 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner II: Family & Group Psychotherapy (3)
    This course provides the PMHNP student with advanced knowledge in group psychotherapy techniques that are applicable across the lifespan. This course focuses on the theoretical and conceptual models of group dynamics and utilizes evidence-based practices in assessing, planning, treating, and evaluating dysfunctional patterns in groups. Additionally, this course promotes and maintains effective and therapeutic communication patterns in a variety of groups settings.
  • NGR5508L - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner II: Family & Group Psychotherapy Lab (3)
    This course provides clinical experiences in the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of clients across the lifespan who are experiencing acute and/or chronic psychiatric disorders. Emphasis is placed on evidenced-based practice and the utilization of theoretical and conceptual models for assessing, planning, and treating major psychiatric disorders. Moreover, emphasis is given to promoting, maintaining, and restoring wellness to clients of all ages. Holistic therapeutic approaches are used to enhance the functioning of diverse individuals across the lifespan.
  • NGR5538 - Psychopharmacology for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing (3)
    Prerequisite: NGR5172.
    This course provides a review of common psychoactive medications, classes, uses, effects, side effects, and prescriptive implications related to nursing care of clients with psychiatric mental health illness, including children, adolescents, and adults. Content is presented in relation to the role of psychiatric mental health nurse who functions in an advanced role in a variety of settings. Emphasis is on the selection and use of psychoactive medications to help reduce emotional pain and increase personal autonomy of patients suffering from mental illness. An additional focus is to increase cultural competence by understanding the impact of psychoactive medications on the client, family, and community.
  • NGR5718C - Evaluation in Nursing Education (4)
    This course is designed to introduce the graduate nursing student to theories and methods of evaluation in nursing education at the individual, course, and program level. Applications of testing and measurement relevant to the health professions will be examined. Focus will be placed on effective test design and test writing skills, other methods of evaluating performance in the classroom and clinical settings, and the analysis of evaluation tools for educational purposes. In addition, the student will develop a personal philosophy of teaching/learning.
  • NGR5772L - Clinical Leadership Practicum I (3)
    This course emphasizes the development of nursing leadership skills in managing health care microsystems and mesosystems. The course provides students with opportunities to intergrate bioethical and legal dimensions into clinical leadership and management decision making. Innovations in human resource management and patient care delivery systems are also emphasized.
  • NGR6702 - Effecting Change in Healthcare Quality and Safety (3)
    This course examines implementing change in quality and safety in a challenging healthcare environment. Course content includes change theory, quality management models and tools, benchmarking and quality databases, safety in the healthcare environment, use of evidence in quality and safety, interprofessional relationships in improving organizational outcomes, descriptive statistics and relationship statistics and risk management. Emphasis is placed on the student's development of a change project in quality or safety.
  • OCE1001 - Elementary Oceanography (3)
    Prerequisite: MGF1106 or MGF1107.
    This course studies the structure and motion of the ocean and its environs, properties, populations, and energy budget. Not intended for upper-division science or mathematics majors. Upper-division science or mathematics majors are encouraged instead to take OCE 4008.
  • PAD3003 - Public Administration in American Society (3)
    This introductory course in public administration studies the management of large-scale government bureaucracies including organization, career systems, and financing. It also focuses on the role of bureaucracies in modern society in the formulation and implementation of public policy.
  • PAD3013 - Futures Studies (3)
    This course applies futures studies perspectives and methods to the study of societal trends and conditions. Emphasis is on the development of anticipatory public policy.
  • PAD4075 - Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to give students an overview of what UAS can do to support the phases of emergency management (response, recovery, planning, preparedness, and mitigation). The course includes the core concepts and theory behind UAS use, and exposure to regulations, guiding policies, limitations and exclusions.
  • PAD4144 - Managing the Nonprofit Organization (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the central theories of non-profit enterprise, and the implications of various management practices for nonprofit organizations. The course also introduces students to the major aspects of nonprofits and voluntary organizations that distinguish them from public and private organizations ? i.e. mission/vision; legal definitions/IRS rulings; voluntary governance structures and a social change agenda.
  • PAD4374 - Introduction to Terrorism: Preparedness and Response (3)
    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories, principles, and practices of terrorism and terrorist events.
  • PAD4375 - Advanced Topics in Terrorism (3)
    Prerequisite: PAD4374.
    This course reviews the contemporary evolution of terrorism and the current direction of global terrorism with regards to domestic policies and programs. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • PAD4380 - Disasters: From Shock to Recovery (3)
    This course utilizes multiple case studies to examine the complexity of disaster situations in the United States and internationally. The course covers a different disaster case study every week, focusing on event-specific conditions that created/contributed to the disaster, local preparedness, response and recovery in the aftermath of the event.
  • PAD4382 - Disaster Recovery and Mitigation (3)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of recovery and mitigation activities in the post-disaster environment. Focusing on the "Recovery Phase" initially, course materials examine the policy and planning mechanisms involved in short and long term rehabilitation of distressed communities. A similar examination from the "Mitigation Phase" is also made.
  • PAD4391 - Foundations in Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts, theories, principles, and practices of emergency management.
  • PAD4393 - Emergency Management Programs, Planning, and Policy (3)
    This course examines functional demands that emergency managers should be aware of in crafting emergency management programs. Students investigate how public policy choices impact emergency planning and the consequences of a disaster event. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • PAD4433 - Women, Disasters, and Conflict (3)
    This course examines the role of women in disasters. The course also evaluates the role that women play in conflict and peace building. The course covers topics to include gender mainstreaming, LGBTQ issues, UNSCR 1325, gender based violence, and human trafficking.
  • PAD4833 - International and Comparative Disaster Management (3)
    This course discusses practical and theoretical issues associated with international disaster management. Risk, hazards, and disasters are addressed from a global perspective with particular emphasis placed on the differences in key issues between developing and developed countries.
  • PAD4841 - Intelligence Analysis and Communication (3)
    This course explores the variety of intelligence analysis tools and techniques common to U.S. federal, state, and local agencies, using simulations and activities to understand how raw information is transformed and presented as intelligence. Emphasis is placed on OSINT analysis, but other-source intelligence is included based upon industry needs. Additionally, plain language writing and intelligence presentations is included in learning materials.
  • PAD4843 - U.S. Intelligence Community (3)
    This course familiarizes students with the U.S. Intelligence community, the processes and platforms for information/data gathering and analysis, and how the subsequent "intelligence" is used by policy/decision-makers. Throughout the course, students are given opportunities to gather, analyze, and report their findings to case-studies and then compare their conclusions to real-world outcomes. Students gain a broad knowledge of U.S. Intelligence operations and the social, economic, military, and covert actions resulting from Intelligence recommendations.
  • PAD4844 - Public Health and Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of international public health events that have either evolved into disasters, or are born of disasters. In addition, this course looks at preventing and preparing for public health disasters. A variety of threats and case studies are reviewed with an evaluation of future threats. Additionally, epidemiology and the discovery and reporting of events are reviewed.
  • PAD4890 - Homeland Security; Policy and Practice (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the concept and application of homeland security policies and their influence on U.S. domestic policy.
  • PAD5079 - Unmanned Aircraft Systems in Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to give students an overview of what UAS can do to support the phases of emergency management (response, recovery, planning, preparedness, and mitigation). The course includes the core concepts and theory behind UAS use, and exposure to regulations, guiding policies, limitations and exclusions.
  • PAD5376 - Introduction to Terrorism: Preparedness and Response (3)
    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories, principles, and practices of terrorism and terrorist events.
  • PAD5377 - Advanced Topics in Terrorism (3)
    Prerequisite: PAD5376.
    This course reviews the contemporary evolution of terrorism and the current direction of global terrorism with regards to domestic policies and programs. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours.
  • PAD5388 - Disaster Recovery and Mitigation (3)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of recovery and mitigation activities in the post-disaster environment. Focusing on the "Recovery Phase" initially, course materials examine the policy and planning mechanisms involved in short and long term rehabilitation of distressed communities. A similar examination from the "Mitigation Phase" is also made.
  • PAD5389 - Disasters: From Shock to Recovery (3)
    This course utilizes multiple case studies to examine the complexity of disaster situations in the United States and internationally. The course covers a different disaster case study every week, focusing on event-specific conditions that created/contributed to the disaster, local preparedness, response and recovery in the aftermath of the event.
  • PAD5397 - Foundations of Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts, theories, principles and practices of emergency management.
  • PAD5398 - Emergency Management Programs, Planning, and Policy (3)
    This course examines functional demands that emergency managers should be aware of in crafting emergency management, policies and programs. Students explore how public policy choices impact emergency planning and the consequences of a disaster event.
  • PAD5835 - International and Comparative Disaster Management (3)
    This course discusses practical and theoretical issues associated with international disaster management. Risk, hazards, and disasters are addressed from a global perspective with particular emphasis placed on the differences in key issues between developing and developed countries.
  • PAD5845 - Public Health and Emergency Management (3)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of international public health events that have either evolved into disasters, or are born of disasters. In addition, this course looks at preventing and preparing for public health disasters. A variety of threats and case studies are reviewed with an evaluation of future threats. Additionally, epidemiology and the discovery and reporting of events are reviewed.
  • PAD5848 - U.S. Intelligence Community (3)
    This course explores the functions and roles of the different players within the U.S. Intelligence Community. Additionally students are acquainted with the processes and platforms for information gathering and analysis and how the developed intelligence is used by policy makers.
  • PAD5895 - Homeland Security; Policy and Practice (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the concept and application of homeland security policies and their influence on U.S. domestic policy.
  • PAD5896 - U.S. Intelligence Analysis and Communication (3)
    This course explores the variety of intelligence analysis tools and techniques common to U.S. federal, state, and local agencies, using simulations and activities to understand how raw information is transformed and presented as intelligence. Emphasis will be placed on OSINT analysis, but other-source intelligence will be included based upon industry needs. Additionally, plain language writing and intelligence presentations will be included in learning materials.
  • PET3361 - Nutrition and Sports (3)
    Prerequisite: HUN1201 and PET3322.
    This course studies the effects of sports training upon individual nutrient stores and requirements. The effects of nutrient intake upon sports performance.
  • POS4284 - Courts, Law, and Politics (3)
    This course surveys the judicial system and its links to politics in the United States. Covers the U.S. Supreme Court, other federal courts, and state and local courts. Topics include legal education and law careers, role of lawyers in court, selection of judges, how civil and criminal cases get to and through the courts, plea bargaining, judicial decision-making, and court-made public policy.
  • PSY2023 - Careers in Psychology (1)
    Prerequisite: PSY2012.
    This course is intended for psychology majors who are uncertain about their career goals. Students learn what career opportunities are available in psychology and related fields and what these careers involve. Students are encouraged to take this course early in their undergraduate years so they can pursue opportunities at FSU that will help prepare them for their chosen career paths.
  • PUR3000 - Introduction to Public Relations (3)
    This course if designed to introduce the student to the principles and practices of the public relations profession throughout all organizations using public relations.
  • QMB3200 - Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions (3)
    Prerequisite: CGS2100 and STA2023.
    This course examines classical and modern decision-making techniques based on probabilistic concepts. Emphasizes applications to all areas of business.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • REE4941 - Real Estate Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
    This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real-world experience in the real estate field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director. S/U grade only.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • REE5105 - Real Estate Valuation (3)
    This course focuses on the valuation of income-producing properties and covers topics fundamental to the valuation of real estate, including the process, procedures and valuation methods.
  • Introduction to World Religions videoREL1300 Introduction to World Religions | View video text only (3)
    This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
    This course meets the state and University Gordon Rule writing requirements.
  • RMI2302 - Risk in Business & Society (3)
    This course is designed to enhance student understanding of risk and its implications for individuals, business, and society. The course focuses on the impact of uncertainty on decisions and the risk-reward tradeoff. Students analyze the implications of risk in a variety of settings.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • RMI4941 - Risk Management and Insurance Internship (3)
    Prerequisite: RMI3011 and six additional hours of business/risk management and insurance coursework..
    This internship is designed for College of Business students who desire to gain real world experience in the risk management/insurance field through on-the-job practice. Students work under the direction of an approved industry professional, a faculty advisor, and the internship director.
    NOTE: This course may be restricted to specific majors; contact the department for additional information.
  • RMI5225C - Property/Liability Insurance Contract Analysis (3)
    This course will analyze basic commercial property and liability insurance contracts, including commercial property, commercial general liability, crime, inland marine, boiler and machinery, commercial auto and farm policies. The course will focus on both the terms of the contract as well as their usage.
  • RMI5810 - Personal Financial Planning (3)
    Focus on individual/family financial planning including risk analysis, wealth accumulation, and retirement planning.
  • RTV3001 - Media Techniques (3)
    Introduction to basic principles and terminology associated with photography, filmmaking, television, and radio.
  • SOW5034 - The Social Work Profession (3)
    This course helps students to begin to identify with the social work profession, its history, mission, and core values, and to conduct themselves in accordance with the ethical principles that guide professional practice. Students learn how the social work profession engages in policy and practice to address issues of social and economic well-being. Students also begin to recognize the social, political, economic, and environmental influences on client systems of all sizes and apply them to the conduct of social work practice.
  • SOW5125 - Psychopathology in Clinical Practice (3)
    This course provides an overview of mental health assessment and diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic Statistical Manual categories, and touches on treatment strategies and techniques. Building on the knowledge base acquired in the foundation course, SOW 5105, this course examines the relationship between the biological, psychological, social, environmental, and cultural influences and emotional and mental health from an ecological context. Particular attention is given to variations in the assessment process and access to treatment for populations at social and economic risk. In addition, students examine the political and social implications of mental health and their relations to social work values and ethics.
  • SOW5235 - Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)
    This course provides a beginning understanding of the relationship between social welfare and social policy from a social work perspective. Students engage in policy practice to address social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services across diverse populations. Attention is given to critical analysis of the role that social work and social welfare policies and programs play in advancing human rights and social and economic justice. Emphasis is placed on the advancement of social and economic justice and human rights in a global context.
  • SOW5308 - Social Work Practice (3)
    This course provides students with an understanding of the social work profession's history, mission, values, ethics, and roles. Content on generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities is covered, and attention is given to working with ethnic minorities, women, gays and lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5369 - Integrative Seminar in Advanced Social Work Practice (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: SOW5535.
    This course integrates theoretical models and concepts with practice gained in internships. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the dynamic interaction between the individual, family, communities, organizations, and other social systems. A major focus is on the social worker's role in responding effectively to the challenges of working with these systems, and exploring their own personal views of such issues as ethics, gender, ethnic minorities, gays, lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5435 - Social Program Evaluation (3)
    This course presents the historical and contemporary importance of social program evaluation and research methods. The course focuses on applied qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods that are useful to managers, public administrators, and policy analysts. Particular emphasis is placed on evidence-based procedures/methods that will be useful for social work administrators for designing and carrying out an evaluation of social programs and policies. How programs and policies can further the cause of social and economic justice for oppressed and disadvantaged groups is also explored.
  • SOW5532 - Graduate Field Instruction I (5 to 10)
    Prerequisite: SOW5308. (S/U grade only).
    This course is required for first-year graduate students and taken concurrently with coursework. Students are provided with a supervised generalist social work practice experience in a variety of settings. May be repeated to a maximum of ten semester hours.
  • SOW5535 - Graduate Field Instruction II (6 to 12)
    Prerequisite: SOW5369.
    This course is required for advanced graduate students and taken concurrently with Advanced Seminar in Social Work Practice. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • SOW5537 - Field Instruction: Special Placement (12)
    This course is an elective placement designed to assist students in developing additional skills in social work practice in order to meet specialized and individual needs. The course may be taken only by special arrangement through the Office of Field Instruction.
  • SOW5603 - Social Work in Health Settings (3)
    This course focuses on social work practice in health settings from a "person-in-environment" perspective, preparing students with an understanding of the roles that social workers play in health settings; the structure of health care delivery systems; organizational and professional ethics and standards; challenges we face in health care policy; patient issues and how to help address these issues. Specific knowledge and skills in a health care setting are addressed, including biopsychosocial assessments, chart documentation, treatment planning, and discharge planning.
  • SOW5614 - Family Violence Across the Life Span (3)
    This course, looking at violence across the life span, provides an ecological perspective emphasizing the interconnections between individuals experiencing violence and their social environments. Emphasis is placed upon broad coverage of all-important aspects of child abuse, incest, intimate partner violence, rape, and elder abuse. This course is appropriate for students who wish to gain skill in detecting and responding to incest situations for clients, sexual assault survivors, and victims of intimate partner violence or elder abuse.
  • SOW5646 - Gerontological Social Work (3)
    This course introduces students to the field of social gerontology and gerontological social work. Topics include the demography, physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of aging; health-care and social policies that impact older persons, caregivers, and the aging network of services; ways in which forms of oppression (such as ageism, sexism, racism, ablebodyism, beautism, and homophobia) impact our work with older people; as well as ways to promote dignity, self-determination, and socio-economic justice for older persons.
  • SOW5659 - Child Maltreatment and Child Welfare (3)
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills related to the theory, research, and implications of child and adolescent maltreatment for child development and well-being. Course content is presented within the context of child welfare practice and social work with children and adolescents in public agencies and programs. Issues related to children, families, and communities are covered and attention is given to working with ethnic minorities, women, gays and lesbians, and persons with disabilities. Particular attention is given to federal and state child welfare statutes including Chapter 39, Florida statutes including the Adoption and Safe Families Act and the range of services provided by the Department of Children and Families and other agencies.
  • SOW5712 - Chemical Dependency Problems and Programs (3)
    This course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge of the aspects of chemical dependency in American society. Students examine the etiology and epidemiology of substance abuse, treatment approaches, and major policies and programs relevant to the prevention and treatment of substance abuse through the use of readings, PowerPoint lectures, Web sites, and structured discussions. Special attention is given to substance use and abuse among specific populations including adolescents, older adults, women, racial and ethnic minorities, gays and lesbians, and persons with disabilities. The effect of substance abuse on families, communities, and social systems is examined utilizing a systems approach.
  • SOW5807 - Clinical Practice (3)
    This advanced practice course emphasizes development of clinical skills. Students refine their clinical skills, building on the research-based non-specific (common factors) components of therapeutic work (i.e., therapeutic alliance, empathy, goal consensus/collaboration, positive regard/affirmation, and genuineness) and specific factors (validated treatments). The course provides in-depth coverage of three empirically-based models: Solution Focused, Motivation Interviewing, and Interpersonal Therapy. Learning application of techniques informed by these models provides opportunities to enhance professional use of self. The course examines similarities and differences among models and allows students to discern appropriate use of techniques, client populations, settings, and problem interactions. Students develop competency in the ethical and strength-based use of these models.
  • SOW5908 - Directed Individual Study (4)
    Course Description not on file
  • SPA5012 - Introduction to Communication Science (4)
    This course provides an overview of the speech sciences. Information integrates scientific material relating to the acoustics, anatomy, and physiology of speech production and perception. Specific topics include sound, respiration, phonation, articulation, audition, and the nervous system along with clinical cases that affect these areas of speech science. This introductory course is expected to serve as a basis for understanding the science of speech and to provide a foundation for advanced graduate-level coursework in speech functions.
  • SPA5055 - Professional Tools in Speech-Language Pathology (1-3)
    This course repeats with different topics covered each semester. Topics covered include clinical bases for planning and conduct of therapy, behavior management, counseling, ethics, certification and licensure, instrumentation, and clinical research methods.
  • SPA5102 - Neurological Basis of Communication (4)
    This course provides an overview of the normal neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of human communication (speech, language, and hearing), while also covering introductory information related to neuropathologies and clinical causes that affect communication.
  • SPA5204 - Phonological Disorders (3)
    This course identifies and examines traditional and psycholinguistic theory and approaches to management of defective articulation. Provides the student with training in the treatment of defective articulation.
  • SPA5252 - Speech Production and Swallowing Disorders (3)
    This is a foundation course to prepare SLP students to evaluate and manage communication disorders of voice, fluency, and articulation plus dysphasia and laryngectomy.
  • SPA5432 - Autism & Severe Communicative Disabilities (3)
    This course explores strategies for language and communication assessment and intervention of children, adolescents, and adults with autism and other severe communicative disabilities. Includes functional analysis of challenging behaviors and decision making for the selection of augmentative communication systems.
  • SPA5500 - Clinical Practicum in Schools (3)
    Prerequisite: SPA4503.
    This course provides supervised therapy practice in therapy procedures with school-aged persons presenting various communication problems. Seminar covers educational and therapy topics relative to public professional activities.
  • SPA5526L - Laboratory in Child Speech/Language Pathology Diagnostics (1-3)
    This course provides completion of formal and informal evaluation procedures with children who have speech and/or language disorders. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • SPA5559 - Augmentative Communication Systems (3)
    This course provides an overview of augmentative and alternative communication systems (AAC) and the process for selecting and implementing these systems. Application of AAC systems for nonspeaking individuals with developmental and acquired disorders is covered.
  • SPA5942 - Community Clinical Practicum (4)
    This clinical practicum provides students with supervised experiences in a variety of community-based settings. May be repeated to a total of four semester hours.
  • SPA5944 - Speech-Language Pathology Internship (1-12)
    This course provides intensive practical experience in the diagnosis and/or treatment of persons with speech-language and hearing disorders in service oriented professional settings under the close supervision of persons who have clinical certification from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. To be completed in the final semester of the master's program. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • SPC3210 - Contemporary Human Communication (3)
    This introductory course surveys current scholarship in five areas of communication theory: group, rhetorical, interpersonal, legal, and performance communication.
  • SPC3231 - Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (3)
    This course examines rhetorical theorists of the 20th century, including Burke, Richards, Foucault, Habermas, Fisher, and Weaver.
  • SPC3513 - Argumentation (3)
    This course focuses on the principles of argumentation theory and the practical applications of these principles in different argumentative situations. Traditional as well as contemporary approaches to the study of argument are combined with the settings of argument to provide a practical experience for each student.
  • SPM4011 - Sport History (3)
    This course provides a survey of significant time periods beginning with the Ancient Greeks and ending with the current society. The survey reviews sport issues and practices across time, aiming to inform students about the role of sport in our current society.
  • SPM4013 - Cross-Cultural Sport (3)
    This course approaches sport through a variety of global perspectives and cultural lenses. Students are exposed to different national contexts, histories, leagues, and governing bodies, as well as the social, cultural, political, and economic imperatives organizing sport and its management, including global mega-events (e.g., Olympics, World Cup) and national structures (e.g., Barclay's Premier League).
  • SPM4014 - Sport and Literature (3)
    This course uses literary theory to critically analyze and interpret a series of popular sport-related novels. The course focuses on the role that literature in general, and sport-based books in particular, has played in promoting and challenging structures of gender, nationalism, sexuality, race, social class, and ability in the United States and Western society more generally.
  • STA1013 - Statistics through Example (3)
    This course provides students with a background in applied statistical reasoning. Fundamental topics are covered including graphical and numerical description of data, understanding randomness, central tendency, correlation versus causation, line of best fit, estimation of proportions, and statistical testing.
  • STA2023 - Fundamental Business Statistics (3)
    This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
  • STA2122 - Introduction to Applied Statistics (3)
    Prerequisite: MAC1105 or equivalent.
    This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
  • STA3032 - Applied Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (3)
    Prerequisite: MAC2312.
    This course covers calculus-based probability, discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, sampling distributions, and the central limit theorem. Topics include descriptive statistics, interval estimates and hypothesis tests, ANOVA, correlation, simple and multiple regression, analysis of categorical data, and statistical quality control.
  • STA5066 - Data Management and Analysis with SAS (3)
    This course introduces SAS software in lab-based format. SAS is the world's most widely used statistical package for managing and analyzing data. The objective of this course is for students to develop the skills necessary to address data management and analysis issues using SAS. This course includes a complete introduction to data management for scientific and industrial data and an overview of SAS statistical procedures.
  • SYA3741 - Sociology of Death and Dying (3)
    This course explores the structure of human response to death, dying, and bereavement with a focus on sociocultural and interpersonal context. The course explores how cultural and medical factors shape experience of a "good death", grief over the life course, functions of funeral practices, and death-related ethical debates such as physician assisted suicide.
  • SYA4300 - Methods of Social Research (3)
    This course is a broad coverage of research design, data collection, and data analysis. The course is required for sociology majors.
  • SYA4400 - Social Statistics (3)
    This course involves the application of statistical techniques to sociological data as illustrated in the research and writing of social scientists. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student's methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by sociologists. The student is expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of sociological data and to interpret the results. This is a required course for sociology majors.
  • SYD3600 - Cities in Society (3)
    This course explores changes in societal scale and structure associated with development of cities and urban societies, the impact on individuals and social groups of the urban context, and the ways that life in cities is influenced by social inequalities related to ethnicity, social class, and other dimensions of social organization.
  • SYD3800 - Sociology Sex and Gender (3)
    This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.
  • SYG1000 - Introductory Sociology (3)
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of sociology. In the course, emphasis is placed on exposure to the basic findings of empirical research studies in a wide range of areas traditionally examined by sociologists.
  • SYG2010 - Social Problems (3)
    This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.
  • SYG2430 - Sociology of Marriage and the Family (3)
    This course focuses on marriage and family relationships over the life course. Topics covered include dating, love, sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, reconstituted families, parenting, and marital and family relationships in later life. The major course objective is to critically analyze some of our most private social relationships from a sociological perspective.
  • SYO3530 - Social Classes and Inequality (3)
    This course explores the basic theory of social stratification that is presented and used in description of the stratification system in the United States and other nations. The course gives opportunity for social mobility in the social structure is assessed and compared with rates of mobility in other countries.
  • SYP4550 - Alcohol and Drug Problems (3)
    This course presents a review and analysis of sociological approaches to the study of alcohol and drug problems. It addresses theoretical perspectives on recreational and deviant drinking and drug use and introduces important empirical methods in the study of alcohol and drug problems and current debates over alcohol and drug policy.
  • SYP4650 - Sports and Society (3)
    This course explores the topics of sport from a critical perspective focusing especially on inequalities in gender, race, class, and power. This class jointly examines sports as a social mirror that reflects status inequalities as well as the role of sports in perpetrating social inequalities.
  • SYP5105 - Theories of Social Psychology (3)
    This course examines the major theoretical orientations in contemporary social psychology. Special attention is given to perspectives such as symbolic interactionism, social learning theory, expectation states/status characteristics theory, emotions work theory, and Goffman's dramatization theory.
  • THE2000 - Introduction to Theatre (3)
    This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
  • URP3000 - Introduction to Planning and Urban Development (3)
    This course introduces planning concepts and the role of planning in formulating policy, meeting critical problems, and shaping the future urban environment.
  • URP5525 - Health Behavior and Education (3)
    This course explores and applies various theoretical models used to explain the behaviors that influence health. Educating persons about the risks of certain behaviors is a fundamental component in the holistic model of health.
  • World Cities: Quality of Life videoURS1006 World Cities: Quality of Life | View video text only (3)
    In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.
    This course meets the University's multicultural course requirements.


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