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Advanced Standing Master of Social Work, MSW

For More Information

Christine Adamczyk
Christine.Adamczyk@onlineadvising.fsu.edu
850.688.1189

Learn more from the
Advanced Standing Master of Social Work web site.

An Advanced Standing program is designed as a part-time program for working professionals to complete within two years and is available for students who have completed a bachelor's of Social Work from a Council on Social Work Education-accredited program. It is clinically focused and offers field placements that may align with students' interests. Students take courses at a time for a total of 39 credit hours, including one field placement. Masters of Social Work transfer students can transfer up to seven credits from another two-year CSWE-accredited Master of Social Work program. The student must have completed one year of studies, including a generalist field placement.

Accreditation

Accredited through SACS and the Council on Social Work Education

Method of Delivery

Internet

Time or Location Requirements

Students must also reside in a state within the accepted coverage areas and be able to complete one face-to-face field placement.

Time to Completion

It is recommended that students take 2 courses for a total of 6 credit hours each semester. This allows most students to finish in six semesters (2 years).

Core Courses

These courses may not be offered every semester.

  • SOW5125 Psychopathology in Clinical Practice (3)
    This course provides an overview of mental health assessment and diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic Statistical Manual categories, and touches on treatment strategies and techniques. Building on the knowledge base acquired in the foundation course, SOW 5105, this course examines the relationship between the biological, psychological, social, environmental, and cultural influences and emotional and mental health from an ecological context. Particular attention is given to variations in the assessment process and access to treatment for populations at social and economic risk. In addition, students examine the political and social implications of mental health and their relations to social work values and ethics.
  • SOW5367 Theories and Practice of Crisis Intervention (3)
    This course introduces students to the theoretical foundations and practice models of crisis intervention and other forms of brief treatment.
  • SOW5369 Integrative Seminar in Advanced Social Work Practice (3)
    This course integrates theoretical models and concepts with practice gained in internships. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the dynamic interaction between the individual, family, communities, organizations, and other social systems. A major focus is on the social worker's role in responding effectively to the challenges of working with these systems, and exploring their own personal views of such issues as ethics, gender, ethnic minorities, gays, lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5432 Evaluation of Social Work Practice (3)
    In this course, major emphasis is given to the use of single systems designs in client assessment and evaluation. Students consider the philosophical and ethical aspects of an evaluative approach to treatment and examine the policy implications of professional participation (or lack thereof) in evaluation processes. Topics include the operational "diagnosis" of client problems, measurement and monitoring of symptoms, goals, and interventions, and analysis, interpretation, and reporting of case material for accountable social work practice. Issues of ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and disability are also explored through application of course content to appropriate case examples.
  • SOW5535 Graduate Field Instruction II (6 to 12)
    This course is required for advanced graduate students and taken concurrently with Advanced Seminar in Social Work Practice. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.

Total Credit Hours

39

Prerequisites

Applicants must have earned a BSW from a CSWE-accredited institution, complete a College of Social Work application and submit a Statement of Purpose and four letters of recommendation, submit a copy of a BSW internship evaluation or letter of recommendation from the field office, prepare for and take the GRE, and have a minimum of 400 hours of field education in generalist practice. Students must also reside in a state within the accepted coverage areas.

Application Procedures

One official copy of your transcripts from each undergraduate and/or graduate school you have attended, official GRE scores, your application, personal statement, resume, letters of recommendation, a copy of your final field evaluation, and the petition for exceptional consideration (if applicable) must be submitted to the College of Social Work. Visit the College's website to complete the online application. Application deadlines are May first for Fall and October first for Spring.

Program Requirements

All course work must be completed within four years of starting the program. A GPA of 3.0 is required for graduation.

Fees

The cost of this program is equal to tuition and fees for the Academic Year 2017-18 as stated on the Student Business Services website, plus a per credit hour distance learning fee (fees vary by course). Special market rates may be available. Contact the department for more specific fee information relative to student status and location.

Spring 2018 Course Offerings

  • SOW5125 Psychopathology in Clinical Practice (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course provides an overview of mental health assessment and diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic Statistical Manual categories, and touches on treatment strategies and techniques. Building on the knowledge base acquired in the foundation course, SOW 5105, this course examines the relationship between the biological, psychological, social, environmental, and cultural influences and emotional and mental health from an ecological context. Particular attention is given to variations in the assessment process and access to treatment for populations at social and economic risk. In addition, students examine the political and social implications of mental health and their relations to social work values and ethics.
  • SOW5308 Social Work Practice (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course provides students with an understanding of the social work profession's history, mission, values, ethics, and roles. Content on generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities is covered, and attention is given to working with ethnic minorities, women, gays and lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5369 Integrative Seminar in Advanced Social Work Practice (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: SOW5535.
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course integrates theoretical models and concepts with practice gained in internships. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the dynamic interaction between the individual, family, communities, organizations, and other social systems. A major focus is on the social worker's role in responding effectively to the challenges of working with these systems, and exploring their own personal views of such issues as ethics, gender, ethnic minorities, gays, lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5376 Budgeting and Finances in Social Services (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: SOW5353. SOW5353.
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course emphasizes the political and technical skills of budgeting and financial management, source development via grant writing and fundraising, government contracting, fiscal reporting, and payroll management.
  • SOW5535 Graduate Field Instruction II (6 to 12)
    Prerequisite: SOW5369.
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course is required for advanced graduate students and taken concurrently with Advanced Seminar in Social Work Practice. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • SOW5603 Social Work in Health Settings (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course focuses on social work practice in health settings from a "person-in-environment" perspective, preparing students with an understanding of the roles that social workers play in health settings; the structure of health care delivery systems; organizational and professional ethics and standards; challenges we face in health care policy; patient issues and how to help address these issues. Specific knowledge and skills in a health care setting are addressed, including biopsychosocial assessments, chart documentation, treatment planning, and discharge planning.
  • SOW5614 Family Violence Across the Life Span (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course, looking at violence across the life span, provides an ecological perspective emphasizing the interconnections between individuals experiencing violence and their social environments. Emphasis is placed upon broad coverage of all-important aspects of child abuse, incest, intimate partner violence, rape, and elder abuse. This course is appropriate for students who wish to gain skill in detecting and responding to incest situations for clients, sexual assault survivors, and victims of intimate partner violence or elder abuse.
  • SOW5659 Child Maltreatment and Child Welfare (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills related to the theory, research, and implications of child and adolescent maltreatment for child development and well-being. Course content is presented within the context of child welfare practice and social work with children and adolescents in public agencies and programs. Issues related to children, families, and communities are covered and attention is given to working with ethnic minorities, women, gays and lesbians, and persons with disabilities. Particular attention is given to federal and state child welfare statutes including Chapter 39, Florida statutes including the Adoption and Safe Families Act and the range of services provided by the Department of Children and Families and other agencies.
  • SOW5785 International Social Work and Social Welfare (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course prepares students for international social-work practice and for transnational work with immigrants, refugees, international migrants, etc. It introducesinternational perspectives in the social work field and offers varied examples of social work practice in the U.S., Western and Central European, and Caribbean nations. The course also examines the impact of the global interdependence on social-work practice and policy and helps students learn to critically analyze varied practice approaches utilized in dealing with international welfare issues.
  • SOW5807 Clinical Practice (3)
    This advanced practice course emphasizes development of clinical skills. Students refine their clinical skills, building on the research-based non-specific (common factors) components of therapeutic work (i.e., therapeutic alliance, empathy, goal consensus/collaboration, positive regard/affirmation, and genuineness) and specific factors (validated treatments). The course provides in-depth coverage of three empirically-based models: Solution Focused, Motivation Interviewing, and Interpersonal Therapy. Learning application of techniques informed by these models provides opportunities to enhance professional use of self. The course examines similarities and differences among models and allows students to discern appropriate use of techniques, client populations, settings, and problem interactions. Students develop competency in the ethical and strength-based use of these models.
  • SYP5738 Aging Policies and Services (3)
    This course examines issues faced by older people and the current federal and state policies designed to address these issues. These policies and iss ues are explored in the context of both political economy and the long-term care continuum from independence to dependence.

Fall 2017 Course Offerings

  • SOW5125 Psychopathology in Clinical Practice (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course provides an overview of mental health assessment and diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic Statistical Manual categories, and touches on treatment strategies and techniques. Building on the knowledge base acquired in the foundation course, SOW 5105, this course examines the relationship between the biological, psychological, social, environmental, and cultural influences and emotional and mental health from an ecological context. Particular attention is given to variations in the assessment process and access to treatment for populations at social and economic risk. In addition, students examine the political and social implications of mental health and their relations to social work values and ethics.
  • SOW5369 Integrative Seminar in Advanced Social Work Practice (3)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: SOW5535.
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course integrates theoretical models and concepts with practice gained in internships. The course utilizes an ecosystems perspective, focusing on the dynamic interaction between the individual, family, communities, organizations, and other social systems. A major focus is on the social worker's role in responding effectively to the challenges of working with these systems, and exploring their own personal views of such issues as ethics, gender, ethnic minorities, gays, lesbians, and disabled people.
  • SOW5432 Evaluation of Social Work Practice (3)
    Prerequisite: SOW5404. Coursework equivalent to SOW5404 may be acceptable.
    In this course, major emphasis is given to the use of single systems designs in client assessment and evaluation. Students consider the philosophical and ethical aspects of an evaluative approach to treatment and examine the policy implications of professional participation (or lack thereof) in evaluation processes. Topics include the operational "diagnosis" of client problems, measurement and monitoring of symptoms, goals, and interventions, and analysis, interpretation, and reporting of case material for accountable social work practice. Issues of ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and disability are also explored through application of course content to appropriate case examples.
  • SOW5535 Graduate Field Instruction II (6 to 12)
    Prerequisite: SOW5369.
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course is required for advanced graduate students and taken concurrently with Advanced Seminar in Social Work Practice. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve semester hours.
  • SOW5603 Social Work in Health Settings (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course focuses on social work practice in health settings from a "person-in-environment" perspective, preparing students with an understanding of the roles that social workers play in health settings; the structure of health care delivery systems; organizational and professional ethics and standards; challenges we face in health care policy; patient issues and how to help address these issues. Specific knowledge and skills in a health care setting are addressed, including biopsychosocial assessments, chart documentation, treatment planning, and discharge planning.
  • SOW5646 Aging and Old Age: Social Work with the Aged (3)
    This course introduces students to the field of social gerontology and gerontological social work. Topics include the demography, physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of aging; health-care and social policies that impact older persons, caregivers, and the aging network of services; ways in which forms of oppression (such as ageism, sexism, racism, ablebodyism, beautism, and homophobia) impact our work with older people; as well as ways to promote dignity, self-determination, and socio-economic justice for older persons.
  • SOW5659 Child Maltreatment and Child Welfare (3)
    This course is restricted to specific majors, contact the department for additional information.
    This course provides students with knowledge and skills related to the theory, research, and implications of child and adolescent maltreatment for child development and well-being. Course content is presented within the context of child welfare practice and social work with children and adolescents in public agencies and programs. Issues related to children, families, and communities are covered and attention is given to working with ethnic minorities, women, gays and lesbians, and persons with disabilities. Particular attention is given to federal and state child welfare statutes including Chapter 39, Florida statutes including the Adoption and Safe Families Act and the range of services provided by the Department of Children and Families and other agencies.
  • SOW5712 Chemical Dependency (3)
    This course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge of the aspects of chemical dependency in American society. Students examine the etiology and epidemiology of substance abuse, treatment approaches, and major policies and programs relevant to the prevention and treatment of substance abuse through the use of readings, PowerPoint lectures, Web sites, and structured discussions. Special attention is given to substance use and abuse among specific populations including adolescents, older adults, women, racial and ethnic minorities, gays and lesbians, and persons with disabilities. The effect of substance abuse on families, communities, and social systems is examined utilizing a systems approach.
  • SOW5807 Clinical Practice (3)
    This advanced practice course emphasizes development of clinical skills. Students refine their clinical skills, building on the research-based non-specific (common factors) components of therapeutic work (i.e., therapeutic alliance, empathy, goal consensus/collaboration, positive regard/affirmation, and genuineness) and specific factors (validated treatments). The course provides in-depth coverage of three empirically-based models: Solution Focused, Motivation Interviewing, and Interpersonal Therapy. Learning application of techniques informed by these models provides opportunities to enhance professional use of self. The course examines similarities and differences among models and allows students to discern appropriate use of techniques, client populations, settings, and problem interactions. Students develop competency in the ethical and strength-based use of these models.


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